K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

ATTENTION USERS

LEARN NC is no longer supported by the UNC School of Education and has been permanently archived. On February 1st, 2018, you will only be able to access these resources through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. We recommend that you print or download resources you may need before February 1st, 2018, after which, you will have to follow these instructions in order to access those resources.

Narrow your search

Resources tagged with environmental science are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Back-barrier sounds of the Northern Coastal Province
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.10
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students analyze the five back-barrier sounds in the Northern Province. They look at how weather and wave patterns affect the water within these sounds.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Science)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Barrier islands
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.8
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students examine the difference between simple overwash barrier islands and complex barrier islands. They also learn more about the island-building process and the effect this process can have on daily life on barrier islands.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Chemical indicators of stream health
In Inquiry-based exploration of human impacts on stream ecosystems: The Mud Creek case study, page 5.1
Chemical attributes of a body of water help determine the number and diversity of organisms that it can support. Scientists measure a variety of chemical parameters to assess stream health, including pH, dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solids, turbidity,...
Format: article/classroom content
The coastal dilemma
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.15
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks. Students look at examples of shoreline erosion. They reflect on the impact this erosion can have on human life on the Outer Banks.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Estuarine shorelines behind complex barrier islands
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.14
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students examine the different types of shorelines on the soundside of complex barrier islands. They look at how ocean-side processes affect the soundside of complex barrier islands.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Estuarine shorelines behind simple overwash barrier islands
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.13
This lesson is part of chapter one in the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students take another look at simple overwash and complex barrier islands. They examine more closely how overwash and inlet processes are crucial to the long-term maintenance of barrier islands and how these processes can affect human life.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Fueling the future: Evaluating the sustainability of biofuels
In recent years, there has been a surge in the interest of the manufacturing of biofuels as a replacement for fossil fuels in automobiles. This lesson plan for grades 9-12 requires students to consider the impact and sustainability of using biofuels on the economy, the environment, and society.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Dana Haine.
Generating electricity: Evaluating the sustainability of today's and tomorrow's energy sources
Students will learn about the energy sources used by their local utility provider to generate electricity and will work in small groups to evaluate the sustainability of either a renewable or non-renewable energy source used to generate electricity.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 )
By Dana Haine.
How does a hurricane form?
In Recent North Carolina, page 5.3
Article from NASA explains the science behind hurricanes.
Format: article
Human responses to eroding shorelines
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.16
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students look at efforts that are taken to prevent shoreline erosion. These include building hardened structures along shorelines. Students examine the effects these efforts have on barrier islands.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Hurricane Floyd's lasting legacy
In Recent North Carolina, page 5.2
Article from NASA explains why Hurricane Floyd became such a costly and deadly storm.
Format: article
Mapping rainfall and flooding
In Recent North Carolina, page 5.5
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 6.6
In this activity, students explore maps and data from Hurricanes Floyd, Dennis, and Irene in September-October 1999 to explore their effects on North Carolina's coastal plain.
Format: activity
By David Walbert.
North Carolina Coastal Plain province
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.7
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students compare and contrast the Northern Coastal province and the Southern Coastal province.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
Ocean beaches
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.12
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students learn about various materials found on the beaches of North Carolina's Outer Banks. They read about the processes that bring these materials to the beaches.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Science)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
The physical properties of a stream
In Inquiry-based exploration of human impacts on stream ecosystems: The Mud Creek case study, page 4.1
This article and video introduce you to the physical properties of streams and how they relate to habitat diversity.
Format: article/classroom content
Preventing future floods
In Recent North Carolina, page 5.12
After Hurricane Floyd, some communities in eastern North Carolina began looking seriously at how they might better manage their floodplains to minimize the damage from future floods. This brief article includes a report about the strategy adopted by the city of Kinston.
Format: report
Recent North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore recent North Carolina (1975–present). Topics include politics, the economy, the environment, natural disasters, and increasing diversity.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Role of barrier islands and their inlet/outlet systems
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.9
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students take a closer look at the unique environment that estuaries provide for plants and animals.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Sea-level change and coastal dynamics
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.3
This lesson is a part chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students learn about how the sea level has changed over several thousand years. They also look at sea level changes from the past century and infer what sort of affects these changes have — or will have — on the life of citizens in coastal areas.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.