K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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4-H Club family in their garden
4-H Club family in their garden
In this black and white photograph, three members of the Sauls family, two older girls dressed in skirts and a young boy in overalls, are seen planting a field in Wake County, North Carolina. The boy is shown making holes in the soil with a hoe. One of the...
Format: image/article
Attributes by kids
This activity requires the student to demonstrate an understanding of classification, patterning, and seriation. The students will complete the project based on personal characteristics.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–1 Guidance, Healthful Living, and Social Studies)
By Bunnie R. Brewer.
Benjamin Wadsworth on the duties of children to their parents
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.10
Excerpt from a book by an eighteenth-century Puritan minister about expectations for children's behavior and respect for their parents. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Britt family of Wake County sitting in their living room
Britt family of Wake County sitting in their living room
In this black and white photo, the Britts, a family of five, and a furry white cat are sitting pleasantly in a sunny room filled with plants. “Mother” is writing in a book at a desk located in the corner of the room. She is facing the interior...
Format: image/photograph
Cherokee women
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.8
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.2
Before the arrival of Europeans in North America, women enjoyed a major role in the family life, economy, and government of the Cherokee Indians. Cherokee society was organized according to a matrilineal kinship system, and women were the heads of households. Women also did most of the farming and had a voice in government.
Format: article/primary source
By Theda Perdue.
Child labor in North Carolina's textile mills
The photographs of Lewis Hine show the lives and work of children in North Carolina's textile mill villages in the first decades of the twentieth century.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Children and families in North Carolina
In this lesson plan, elementary students will analyze photographs of children from North Carolina provided by the Green ‘N’ Growing collection from the Special Collections Research Center at North Carolina State University. They will investigate how individuals and families are similar and different, and to begin to acquire an understanding of change over time.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–3 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Collecting family stories
Students will interview relatives and compose a family story on the computer. This lesson was completed in conjunction with two other lesson plans (art and media) using the same theme but could be used alone. Student work from all three lessons was compiled in a student portfolio.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 English Language Arts, Guidance, and Social Studies)
By Amy Honeycutt, Chris Furry, and Diana Hicks.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Commemorative landscapes
These lessons for elementary, middle, and high school were developed in collaboration with The University of North Carolina Library Commemorative Landscapes project to introduce and promote student understanding and writing of North Carolina’s history through commemorative sites, landscapes, and markers.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Families - Then and now
Students apply their knowledge of communities as they compare and contrast the home life described in Sarah Plain and Tall to the home life described in Because of Winn-Dixie.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3 Information Skills and Social Studies)
By Debbie Fox and Sherri Hendrix.
Families in colonial North Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.7
In colonial families, the father had absolute authority over his family, and wives and children were expected to do as they were told. And everyone, even young children, worked to sustain the family.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.
Family at Civil War encampment
Family at Civil War encampment
Family at an encampment of the 31st Pennsylvania Infantry during the Civil War in Washington, D.C., near Fort Slocum.
Format: image/photograph
A family in San Pablito, Mexico
A family in San Pablito, Mexico
A family in San Pablito, Mexico.
Format: image/photograph
Family on Smith's Plantation, Beaufort, South Carolina
Family on Smith's Plantation, Beaufort, South Carolina
Five generations of an African American family on Smith's Plantation, Beaufort, South Carolina.
Format: image/photograph
Family sitting at table, eating dinner and drinking milk
Family sitting at table, eating dinner and drinking milk
In this black and white photograph, a family is seated at a round wooden dining table eating a meal. The family consists of a mother, father, two daughters, a son, and an older man who is probably the grandfather. Both of the men wear suits. The mother wears...
Format: image/photograph
Family traditions
This lesson is a follow-up to the lesson “Who's Your Mama? A Family Who's Who” and is mainly based on The Relatives Came by Cynthia Rylant; therefore, family structure including titles or roles is assumed to be prior knowledge for this lesson.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–1 English Language Development and Social Studies)
By Laura Bahlmann and Mary Lail.
Folklife
Students will learn North Carolina folklore, traditions, war activities, local legends, superstitions, food preparation traditions, art, songs and dances which are unique to the area.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Carolyn Early.
Graphic organizer: The well-ordered family
This activity provides a way for students to further their comprehension as they read an excerpt from a book by an eighteenth-century Puritan minister about children's duties toward their parents. Students will complete a graphic organizer and answer questions about the reading passage.
Format: chart/lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Hanoi storefront displaying statues and other supplies for ancestral altars
Hanoi storefront displaying statues and other supplies for ancestral altars
This storefront in Hanoi displays a colorful variety of statues, dishes, paintings, and shrine boxes that Vietnamese families purchase to decorate their household's ancestral altars. China ruled what is now Vietnam for nearly a thousand years, heavily influencing...
Format: image/photograph