K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Benjamin Wadsworth on the duties of children to their parents
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.10
Excerpt from a book by an eighteenth-century Puritan minister about expectations for children's behavior and respect for their parents. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Cherokee women
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.8
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.2
Before the arrival of Europeans in North America, women enjoyed a major role in the family life, economy, and government of the Cherokee Indians. Cherokee society was organized according to a matrilineal kinship system, and women were the heads of households. Women also did most of the farming and had a voice in government.
Format: article/primary source
By Theda Perdue.
Child labor in North Carolina's textile mills
The photographs of Lewis Hine show the lives and work of children in North Carolina's textile mill villages in the first decades of the twentieth century.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Children and families in North Carolina
In this lesson plan, elementary students will analyze photographs of children from North Carolina provided by the Green ‘N’ Growing collection from the Special Collections Research Center at North Carolina State University. They will investigate how individuals and families are similar and different, and to begin to acquire an understanding of change over time.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–3 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Families in colonial North Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.7
In colonial families, the father had absolute authority over his family, and wives and children were expected to do as they were told. And everyone, even young children, worked to sustain the family.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.
Graphic organizer: The well-ordered family
This activity provides a way for students to further their comprehension as they read an excerpt from a book by an eighteenth-century Puritan minister about children's duties toward their parents. Students will complete a graphic organizer and answer questions about the reading passage.
Format: chart/lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Home is where the hearth is: Using photographs to discuss traditional family roles
In this lesson students will examine pictures of hearths (fireplaces), which used to be the cornerstone of the home and family life. These images, from the Built Heritage Collection at North Carolina State University, will help students use observation skills and inference to draw conclusions about the culture of family life at various points throughout the history of North Carolina and the United States.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Loretta Wilson.
Life in the mill villages
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.3
By 1900, more than nine-tenths of textile workers lived in villages owned by the companies that employed them. Mill villages included stores, churches, and schools, but workers found ways to avoid too much dependence on their employers.
Format: article
By James Leloudis and Kathryn Walbert.
Life on the land: Voices
In North Carolina in the New South, page 1.4
Excerpts of oral history interviews with men and women who grew up on farms in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century North Carolina.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Reading guide: Cherokee women
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 2.7
These questions will help to guide students' reading of "Cherokee Women" and encourage them to think critically about the text. The questions focus primarily on the Cherokee matrilineal kinship system and on the cultural differences between the Cherokee and the Europeans who arrived in the early 1700s.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Reuniting families
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 8.7
Letters from Freedmen's Bureau agents seeking information on the whereabouts of family members of freed slaves. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Teaching suggestions: Families in colonial North Carolina
These teaching suggestions present a variety of ways to work with an article about families in colonial North Carolina. Suggested activities span a wide range of possibilities and offer opportunities for a variety of learning styles.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Two worlds: Educator's guide
Lesson plans and activities to be used with "Two Worlds: Prehistory, Contact, and the Lost Colony" -- the first part of a North Carolina history textbook for secondary students.
Format: book (multiple pages)