K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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4-H and Home Demonstration Work during World War II
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.3
During the years of World War II, North Carolina women were led by Home Demonstration and extension agents in programs to increase food production and preservation. 4-H clubs also aided the war effort, primarily through the "Food for Victory" program and the "Feed a Fighter" campaign.
Format: article
By Amy Manor.
4-H club contributions to the war effort
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.7
This page includes three reports sent by county agents of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service after the war ended. Each county agent outlined the contributions of 4-H club members in his or her county to the war effort. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
4-H mobilization for victory (1943)
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.4
In this letter to local extension agents, the North Carolina Director of Extension, J. O. Shaub, explained what 4-H clubs needed to do to mobilize youth to aid the war effort during World War II. Includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Canning for country and community
In this lesson plan, students will use primary source documents to evaluate the technological challenges of food preservation in the 30s and 40s, compare food preservation in the first half of the twentieth century with today, and consider the political role of food in the community.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Melissa Thibault.
Colonial cooking and foodways
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.15
A reenactor demonstrates cooking over an open fire.
Format: video
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Columbian Exchange
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 5.1
When Christopher Columbus and his crew arrived in the New World, two biologically distinct worlds were brought into contact. The animal, plant, and bacterial life of these two worlds began to mix in a process called the Columbian Exchange. The results of this exchange recast the biology of both regions and altered the history of the world.
Format: article
By J.R. McNeill.
Comparing The Jungle with Fast Food Nation
In this lesson plan, students read an excerpt from Upton Sinclair's 1906 The Jungle and an excerpt from Eric Schlosser's 2002 Fast Food Nation. Students write an essay comparing the intentions, content, and effects of these two publications.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 English Language Arts)
By Jamie Lathan.
Death in a Pot
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.8
This article, republished by the North Carolina State Board of Health in 1900, informed the public about health hazards associated with new, and devious, ways of processing and packaging food. Includes historical commentary about the growth of concern about food safety and of public health as a field.
Format: article/primary source
Enlistment for Victory (1943)
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.5
This "Enlistment for Victory" letter was given to boys and girls as part of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service's "Mobilization for Victory" campaign during World War II. The first part introduces the program; the second is a list of projects that kids could take on. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Feed a Fighter in Forty-Four
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.6
This pamphlet was sent by the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service to 4-H members and other interested youth in the spring of 1944 as part of the ongoing "Feed a Fighter" campaign to mobilize youth to aid the war effort during World War II. Includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Food for fighters
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.1
To feed the 3.5 million men in active service by the end of World War II, the military needed massive quantities of food in small, lightweight, durable packages. The government spent millions of dollars developing various types of rations for soldiers and sailors. This article includes a U.S. Government film about the science and technology behind military rations.
Format: exhibit
By David Walbert.
The forest people
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.3
Paleoindian culture died out across North America by 8000 BC. Archaeologists say this was bound to happen. The Ice Age had ended, the megafauna were extinct, and the boreal forests faded as deciduous ones spread across the East in the warmer climate. Faced with significant environmental changes, the Native Americans adapted. Archaeologists call their way of life and the time in which they lived Archaic.
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
The importance of one simple plant
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.10
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.1
The natives of America could trace the history of maize to the beginning of time. Maize was the food of the gods that had created the Earth. It played a central role in many native myths and legends. And it came to be one of their most important foods. Maize, in some form, made up roughly 65 percent of the native diet. When European settlers reached the New World, they learned to cultivate Indian corn from their native neighbors.
Format: article
By Terry L. Sargent.
Intrigue of the Past
Lesson plans and essays for teachers and students explore North Carolina's past before European contact. Designed for grades four through eight, the web edition of this book covers fundamental concepts, processes, and issues of archaeology, and describes the peoples and cultures of the Paleoindian, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian periods.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Jungle
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.9
Excerpt from The Jungle, 1906 novel by Upton Sinclair exposing working conditions and food safety problems in the meatpacking industry. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Krispy Kreme
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.11
On July 13, 1937, the first Krispy Kreme store opened for business in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The company's success and quick rise to popularity were due both to the personal history of Vernon Rudolph, its owner, and the larger cultural history of doughnuts in America (and more specifically, the American South).
Format: article
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)