K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

Narrow your search

Resources tagged with government are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

1835 amendments to the North Carolina Constitution
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.3
Amendments to the North Carolina state constitution passed in 1835. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
The 1868 constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.11
In accordance with the Reconstruction Acts, North Carolina wrote a new constitution in 1868. In addition to abolishing slavery, the new constitution gave more power to the people and to the governor, and called for free public schools, state prisons, and charitable institutions.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The 1971 constitution
In Postwar North Carolina, page 8.3
North Carolina's constitution was rewritten in 1971 to incorporate the many amendments made since Reconstruction.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
An Act for preventing Tumultuous and riotous Assemblies
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.10
Text of the Johnston Riot Act passed by the North Carolina Assembly in 1771, empowering the governor and colonial officials to use military force to put down uprisings of Regulators. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
An Address to the People of Granville County
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.2
Excerpt of a speech by George Sims, Granville County school teacher and Regulator leader, in 1765. Sims blames corrupt lawyers and public officials for the problems of small farmers in the Piedmont. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Africans before captivity
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.1
Most Africans who came to North America were from West Africa and West Central Africa. This article describes some of the cultures and history of those regions prior to the beginning of the slave trade.
Format: article
The Albany Plan of Union
In Colonial North Carolina, page 8.4
Transcription of a plan adopted by representatives of seven colonies in 1754 to place the British North American colonies under a more centralized government. Although never carried out, it was the first important plan to conceive of the colonies as a collective whole united under one government.
Format: constitution
Amending the U.S. Constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.8
Text of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution, passed after the Civil War to abolish slavery and to guarantee the civil rights of African Americans.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Andrew Jackson calls for Indian removal
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.3
Excerpt from President Andrew Jackson's first inaugural address, 1829, in which he argued that American Indians should be removed west of the Mississippi. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
Anticipation guide: A royal colony
This activity presents students with a series of true/false statements about the early Carolina colony. Students respond to the statements before and after reading an article about the changes in the Carolina colony in its first fifty years, as it was divided into North and South Carolina and changed from a proprietary colony to a royal colony.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Archibald Murphey proposes a system of public education
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.6
Report of a joint legislative committee, 1817, laying out a complete plan for statewide public education, including primary schools, academies, and the University of North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Articles of Confederation
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.2
Full text of the Articles of Confederation, which established the first national government after the American colonies declared their independence from Britain. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
The Bill of Rights
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 6.7
The text of the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, with historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
A Bill to Prevent All Persons from Teaching Slaves to Read or Write, the Use of Figures Excepted (1830)
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.9
Law enacted by the North Carolina General Assembly, 1830. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
A call for independence
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.9
After the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, North Carolina's fourth Provincial Congress met at Halifax in April 1776, and resolved that the colony's delegates to the Continental Congress should support a move to declare independence.
Format: article
A capital in the "wilderness"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 1.3
In 1792, the North Carolina General Assembly voted to place a permanent state capital in Wake County. Joel Lane sold 1,000 acres of land to the state, and in the years that followed, the city of Raleigh was planned and built.
Format: article
Cary's Rebellion
In Colonial North Carolina, page 3.1
Because North Carolina permitted religious freedom, Quakers made up a large portion of the colony's early population and were heavily represented in its government. A division opened in the colony between the Quaker party and supporters of the Church of England, and disputes between the two sides led to violence in 1710–1711.
Format: book
The Charter of Carolina (1663)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.4
In the Charter of Carolina, King Charles II of England granted the eight men known as the Lords Proprietors rights to the land that became North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: charter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Committees of Safety
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 2.9
Excerpts from the minutes of the Committees of Safety set up in North Carolina towns and counties, 1775, for the purpose of enforcing the trade boycott against Britain. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source