K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Death in a Pot
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.8
This article, republished by the North Carolina State Board of Health in 1900, informed the public about health hazards associated with new, and devious, ways of processing and packaging food. Includes historical commentary about the growth of concern about food safety and of public health as a field.
Format: article/primary source
Diseases: A brief guide to causes, symptoms, history, and treatment
Since the beginning of human existence on the planet, diseases have played a significant role in the events of every era. This brief listing of some of the most notorious diseases explains their causes, symptoms, history, prevention, and treatment, and provides links to further information.
Format: article
By Emily Jack.
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Health and beauty in the 1930s
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 3.8
Pamphlet produced by the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service in 1939, explaining rules and guidelines for grooming for teenage girls. Includes reading questions.
Format: pamphlet
How do I look to you?
In this lesson, students will evaluate public service posters and a grooming pamphlet to determine if and how propaganda was used to improve the health of children, and define acceptable appearances for young women in the 1930s.
Format: lesson plan (grade 6–8 English Language Arts)
By Loretta Wilson.
Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.1
An overview of President Lyndon Johnson's "Great Society" programs, which addressed poverty, transportation safety, urban development, and health.
Format: article
North Carolina and the "Blue Death": The flu epidemic of 1918
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.13
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.9
The influenza epidemic of 1918–1919 proved deadlier to North Carolinians than the Great War itself. This article describes the effects of the epidemic and how public health officials tried to stop it.
Format: article
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Quarantines
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.6
This article, published by the North Carolina State Board of Health in 1889, instructed public officials about how to properly quarantine sick people to stop the spread of diseases. Includes historical commentary about common diseases of the time and how they were understood by doctors.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Sanitariums
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.8
In the late nineteenth century, sanitariums were built to house patients with tuberculosis, which was the leading cause of death in the United States. Western North Carolina's climate made it the perfect location for sanitariums.
Format: article
Sanitation and privies
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.10
This article, published by the North Carolina State Board of Health in 1919, tried to educate people about how to improve their health, as well as the health of their neighbors, by building proper outhouses. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Sour stomachs and galloping headaches
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 1.13
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 7.5
Excerpts from an online exhibit about the rise of "patent medicine" in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Includes several examples of packaging and advertising.
Format: exhibit/primary source
Stopping the spread of influenza
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.14
Article published by the North Carolina State Board of Health during the influenza pandemic of 1918–19, instructing the public on how to limit the spread of the disease. Includes historical commentary.
Format: article/primary source
The women's movement
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.6
A brief history of the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s, including equal opportunity, reproductive issues, and the Equal Rights Amendment.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.