K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with home front are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Calling for sacrifice
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 7.1
In this "fireside chat" radio address, delivered in April 1942, President Roosevelt asked Americans to make sacrifices for the war effort. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Canning for country and community
In this lesson plan, students will use primary source documents to evaluate the technological challenges of food preservation in the 30s and 40s, compare food preservation in the first half of the twentieth century with today, and consider the political role of food in the community.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Melissa Thibault.
A female raid
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.7
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 4.4
Newspaper coverage of a raid on local stores by Confederate soldier's wives in Salisbury, North Carolina on March 18, 1863. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
"A female raid" in 1863: Using newspaper coverage to learn about North Carolina's Civil War homefront
In this lesson plan, students will use original newspaper coverage to learn about a raid on local stores by Confederate soldier's wives in March 1863 in Salisbury, North Carolina, and use that historical moment to explore conscription, life on the homefront, economic issues facing North Carolina merchants, the challenges of wartime politics, and the role of newspaper editors in shaping public opinion.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Kathryn Walbert.
Girls helping the cause
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.8
Letter from a young woman to her grandmother in which she describes some of the many activities of southern women on the home front in North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Home Guard
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.10
Letter from a commander of North Carolina's Civil War Home Guard to Governor Zebulon Vance, explaining the chaos in the western part of the state and his efforts to keep order and asking the governor for assistance. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Life under Union occupation
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.13
Diary of Alice Williamson, a sixteen year-old girl living in Union-occupied Tennessee in 1864 during the Civil War. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
"My dear I ha'n't forgot you"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.1
Letter from Elizabeth Watson to her husband, James, a Confederate solider in the Civil War, telling him news from home and how much she misses him. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
"No one has anything to sell"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.8
Diary of Julia Johnson Fisher, a Georgia woman, in March and April 1864, in which she describes the difficulty finding food and other necessities during the Civil War. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Pleading for corn
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.6
Letter from Emma A. Scoolbred of Haywood County, North Carolina, to Colonel Joseph Cathey, asking him for an ox and corn because food has become scarce. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
The Shelton Laurel massacre
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.9
In 1862, Union sympathizers and Confederate deserters from Madison County, North Carolina, raided farms to steal food and supplies. In response, the 64th North Carolina infantry rounded up fifteen men and executed all but two, though only five of the men killed had taken part in the raid.
Format: article
Sherman's march through North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.7
After capturing Atlanta in September 1864, Union General William Sherman led his troops on a "March to the Sea" across Georgia, destroying crops, livestock, supplies, and civilian infrastructure that might possibly support the Confederate war effort. He then turned north into the Carolinas, entering North Carolina in March 1865. This "Carolinas Campaign" ended with the surrender of Confederate General Joseph Johnston to Sherman at Bennett Place on April 26.
Format: article
Slaves escape to Union lines
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.3
Federal Writers' Project interview with former slave Mary Barbour. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
"Where Home Used to Be"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 7.8
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.6
Letter from 16 year-old Janie Smith, whose family home was used as a Confederate hospital during the Battle of Averasboro. She describes the effects of Sherman's March, the battle, and its aftermath. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.