K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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A four-room mill house with gable
A four-room mill house with gable
Format: image/diagram
Hanoi girl tends a toddler sitting in the front basket of a motorcycle
Hanoi girl tends a toddler sitting in the front basket of a motorcycle
A pre-adolescent girl tends a toddler who sits perched in the front basket of a motorcycle parked outside a storefront in Hanoi. The children are both wearing sleeveless pink pajamas. Older sisters and brothers in Asia generally are expected to be responsible...
Format: image/photograph
Housing conditions of the workers in Cannon Mills, Concord, North Carolina
Housing conditions of the workers in Cannon Mills, Concord, North Carolina
This photograph of mill town housing in Concord, North Carolina shows the conditions that workers for the Cannon textile mill lived in. The clapboard houses are very small and sit in the shadow of the mill with its smokestacks billowing dark smoke. The yards...
Format: image/photograph
Intrigue of the Past
Lesson plans and essays for teachers and students explore North Carolina's past before European contact. Designed for grades four through eight, the web edition of this book covers fundamental concepts, processes, and issues of archaeology, and describes the peoples and cultures of the Paleoindian, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian periods.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Life in the mill villages
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.3
By 1900, more than nine-tenths of textile workers lived in villages owned by the companies that employed them. Mill villages included stores, churches, and schools, but workers found ways to avoid too much dependence on their employers.
Format: article
By James Leloudis and Kathryn Walbert.
Mill villages
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.4
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 7.4
Excerpt from D. A. Tompkins' 1899 textbook for cotton mill owners, explaining rationale and design for millworkers' housing. Includes photographs, plans, and historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The pottery makers
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.4
Archaeologists do a bit of shrugging when asked about the Woodland—that time and lifeway tucked between 1000 BC and AD 1000. Some things they readily understand, but others leave them wondering.
Quick study: Mississippian Period
A “cheat sheet” covering basic information about the Mississippian Period and its key characteristics.
Quick study: Woodland Period
A “cheat sheet” covering basic information about the Woodland Period and its key characteristics.
Shadows of North Carolina's past
In Intrigue of the Past, page 4.2
Students will infer past Native American lifeways based on observation, construct a timeline of four major culture periods in Native American history, and compare these lifeways and discuss how they are different and alike.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
A two-room mill house
A two-room mill house
Format: image/photograph
The village farmers
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.5
North Carolina sat on a crossroads by AD 1000. Cultural ideas from other places breezed through it and around it: how to decorate pottery, how to orient political and social life, how to honor the dead, how to structure towns.