K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

Narrow your search

Resources tagged with language arts are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Chronology: The time of my life
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.6
In their study of chronology the students will use personal timelines and an activity sheet to demonstrate the importance of intact information to achieve accuracy, and compare and contrast their timelines with the chronological information contained in a stratified archaeological site.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Culture everywhere
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.3
In their study of culture, students will use a chart to show the different ways that cultures meet basic human needs and recognize that archaeologists study how people from past cultures met basic needs by analyzing and interpreting the artifacts and sites that they left behind.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Desegregating public schools: Integrated vs. neighborhood schools
In this lesson, students will learn about the history of the "separate but equal" U.S. school system and the 1971 Swann case which forced Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools to integrate. Students will examine the pros and cons of integration achieved through busing, and will write an argumentative essay drawing on information from oral histories.
Format: lesson plan (grade 10–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Eyewitness to the flood
In this lesson, students will listen to oral history excerpts from Hurricane Floyd survivors and contrast their experiences with the experiences of the characters in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
A guided journey into the past
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.7
In their study of archaeological resource conservation, students will use guided imagery to discover and judge an alternative way to enjoy artifacts without removing them from archaeological sites.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 Visual Arts Education, English Language Arts, and Social Studies)
How do I look to you?
In this lesson, students will evaluate public service posters and a grooming pamphlet to determine if and how propaganda was used to improve the health of children, and define acceptable appearances for young women in the 1930s.
Format: lesson plan (grade 6–8 English Language Arts)
By Loretta Wilson.
Intrigue of the Past
Lesson plans and essays for teachers and students explore North Carolina's past before European contact. Designed for grades four through eight, the web edition of this book covers fundamental concepts, processes, and issues of archaeology, and describes the peoples and cultures of the Paleoindian, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian periods.
Format: book (multiple pages)
It's in the garbage
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.9
In studying archaeological concepts, students will analyze garbage from different places demonstrate competence in applying the concepts of culture, context, classification, observation and inference, chronology and scientific inquiry.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Looking at an object
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.10
Students will analyze unfamiliar objects in order to observe the attributes of an object, infer the uses of objects; and discover how archaeologists use objects to learn about the past.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Pottery traditions
In Intrigue of the Past, page 4.5
Students will learn how Indian people of North Carolina made and used coiled pottery, summarize why archaeologists study pottery, and make and decorate a replica of a North Carolina coiled pot.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 8 Visual Arts Education and Social Studies)
Scientific inquiry
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.8
In their study of scientific inquiry, students will use an activity sheet to make inferences about what activities go on at different places in school (desk, locker, etc.) and form an hypothesis about how space is used. They will also simulate how archaeologists learn about past people by designing and conducting a research project.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–9 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Site robbers
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.6
Students will use an interview with a Native American to write a newspaper article or letter that expresses concern about robbing archaeological sites.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Take action, save the past
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.8
In their study of archaeological resource conservation, students will use a problem-solving model to identify a problem and solve it creatively.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Teaching about North Carolina American Indians
This web edition is drawn from a teachers institute curriculum enrichment project on North Carolina American Indian Studies conducted by the North Carolina Humanities Council. Resources include best practices for teaching about American Indians, suggestions for curriculum integration, webliographies, and lesson plans about North Carolina American Indians.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Two perspectives on slavery: A comparison of personal narratives
In this lesson, students will evaluate and critique authors' perspectives. Students will read two first-person narratives and analyze how each text is influenced by its author's cultural background.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.

Resources on the web

Ghosts and sea monsters: Analyzing mythology
In this high school language arts lesson, students discuss the characteristics of myths. They then examine historical maps of North Carolina looking for images of sea monsters and write their own descriptions of the monsters and myths about them. (Learn more)
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts)
Provided by: UNC Libraries
Webquest: The journeys and journals of John Lederer
In this eleventh grade language arts lesson, students study maps in relation to primary source texts to glean insights into the discovery of Western North Carolina. Students explore map features and how they increase understanding of the documents. (Learn more)
Format: lesson plan (grade 11 English Language Arts)
Provided by: UNC Libraries