K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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All about life
A primary curriculum based around life and environmental science draws on children's natural curiosity to teach reading, math, and more.
Format: article
By Myra Erexson.
Assessing the learning process
In Math for multiple intelligences, page 3
Assessment, like instruction, needs to be geared toward various learning styles, and teachers can create rubrics for ongoing assessment that keep a formal daily record of what students are learning.
Format: article
By Gretchen Buher and David Walbert.
Differentiated instruction
An introduction to LEARN NC's resources for differentiating instruction for a variety of student populations.
Format: bibliography
Differentiation
Differentiation is the practice of tailoring instruction to diverse learners based on student readiness, interest, and learning styles. This article discusses the four areas in which teachers can differentiate instruction and includes links to resources that support differentiation.
Format: article
By Jennifer Job.
Effective strategies for teaching science vocabulary
In order for students to develop scientific literacy, they need to gain a knowledge of science content and practice scientific habits of mind. This is impossible without knowledge of science vocabulary. This article shares research-based strategies for science vocabulary instruction that are effective for all students, including English language learners.
Format: article/best practice
By Sarah J. Carrier.
Hands-on biology
Hands-on science exploration clarifies difficult concepts and engages learners who have difficulty in more traditional classrooms. This article looks at an inquiry-based classroom that meets the needs of all of its students.
Format: article/best practice
By Waverly Harrell.
Math for multiple intelligences
How a middle-school math teacher realized she was boring and jump-started her career — and her students — by using thematic planning, emphasizing problem solving, and teaching to multiple intelligences.
Format: series (multiple pages)
The power of nonfiction: Using informational text to support literacy in special populations
In Reaching every learner: Differentiating instruction in theory and practice, page 9
This article presents the idea that informational texts, rather than fictional literature, may better help students develop literacy skills -- particularly in students with special needs.
Format: article/best practice
By Joan Barnatt, Ph.D..
Reaching every learner: Differentiating instruction in theory and practice
This series of articles, which balance theory, research, and practice, address a variety of topics within differentiation through text, graphics, and video.
Format: series (multiple pages)
Reading comprehension and English language learners
Teaching reading comprehension and helping English language learners are the responsibility of every teacher, but they are also within the abilities of every teacher. These articles provide strategies for building content-area reading comprehension before, during, and after reading that can help English language learners — and all learners.
Format: series (multiple pages)
Reading comprehension strategies for English language learners
In Reading comprehension and English language learners, page 2
Strategies like think-pair-share, think-alouds, and GIST can help English language learners, content-area learners, and all students make sense of text while they read.
Format: article
By Ellen Douglas.
Two paths to knowledge
For students who who always finish their class work early or want more information than you have time to give, try curriculum compacting.
Format: article
By Waverly Harrell.
When you don't have all the answers
Linda Dow suggests freeing yourself from the necessity to be the eternal expert and descibes techniques for sharing the responsibility for learning and teaching alongside your students.
Format: article
By Linda Dow.