K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Resources tagged with legislation are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

An Act for preventing Tumultuous and riotous Assemblies
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.10
Text of the Johnston Riot Act passed by the North Carolina Assembly in 1771, empowering the governor and colonial officials to use military force to put down uprisings of Regulators. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
An Act to Encourage the Settlement of this Country (1707)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 2.2
Passed by the provincial Assembly of Carolina in 1707, this legislation provides incentives for settlers and explains the justification for doing so. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Black codes
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.9
Excerpts from the North Carolina Revised Code of 1855 with respect to free and enslaved African Americans, known as the "black codes." Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Black codes, 1866
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.6
Excerpts of legislation passed by the North Carolina General Assembly after the Civil War to limit the freedoms of former slaves. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Chatham County farmers protest
In North Carolina in the New South, page 7.4
Petition from the Chatham County Farmers Alliance to the North Carolina General Assembly, 1889, asking for legislation protecting the interests of farmers. Includes historical commentary.
Format: petition/primary source
Child labor laws in North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.2
Excerpt of North Carolina's 1933 law regulating child labor. Includes historical background.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Civil Rights Act of 1964
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.9
The Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibited acts of private discrimination in public places and gave the federal government far broader authority than it had ever previously taken.
Format: article
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Indian Removal Act of 1830
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 10.5
Act of Congress, passed in 1830, authorizing President Andrew Jackson to transfer Eastern Indian tribes to the territories west of the Mississippi River. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert, L. Maren Wood, and David Walbert.
Manumission
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.7
Petition from Ned Hyman to the North Carolina General Assembly asking for his manumission. Hyman claimed that his owner had promised him his freedom upon his owner's death. Includes historical commentary.
Format: petition/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
Military reconstruction
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.10
First Reconstrution Act, passed by Congress over President Johnson's veto in 1867, which established military rule in the former Confederacy until states were formally readmitted to the Union. Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The North Carolina Fund
In Postwar North Carolina, page 6.2
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.13
During the 1960s, the North Carolina Fund was created to wage an "all-out assault on poverty" in the state.
Format: article
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
A petition to free a white slave
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.8
Petition to the North Carolina General Assembly to free an enslaved woman named Lucy. The petitioner, Gurdon Deming, argued that Lucy was too "perfectly White" to be kept in slavery.
Format: petition/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)