K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with letters are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

"Be saved from the jaws of an angry hell"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 3.7
An 1831 letter from Thomas Whitmell Harriss to his sister, in which he begs her to accept Christ as her savior. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Educator's Guides: North Carolina Digital History
Best practices, process guides, worksheets, and other resources for teaching with LEARN NC's digital textbook of North Carolina history.
Format: (multiple pages)
General statement of Sherlock Bronson
In Tobacco bag stringing: Life and labor in the Depression, page 1.6
Virginia-Carolina Service Corporation General Office 1413-15-17 East Franklin Street Richmond, Virginia April 13, 1939. Hon. Graham A. Barden, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. Dear Mr. Barden: Upon my return to Richmond after my interview with you...
Letter activity one
In Tobacco bag stringing: Secondary activity two, page 2
The following excerpt is from a letter from Mr. Sherlock Bronson, a lawyer and president of Virginia-Carolina Service Corporation, to the Honorable Graham Braden, a member of the U. S. House of Representatives. It was written March 16, 1939. The...
Format: lesson plan
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Letter activity three
In Tobacco bag stringing: Secondary activity two, page 4
On April 13, 1939, Mr. Sherlock Bronson wrote a "General statement of Sherlock Bronson of the circumstances and conditions under which the survey of industrial conditions in the tobacco bag stringing area was made, and certain conclusions therefrom" and sent...
Format: lesson plan
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Letter activity two
In Tobacco bag stringing: Secondary activity two, page 3
Read the three short letters of March 31, 1939, April 1, 1939, and April 7, 1939. Who wrote each of...
Format: lesson plan
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Letter of April 1, 1939
In Tobacco bag stringing: Life and labor in the Depression, page 1.4
Box 132, R. #1, Leaksville, N.C., April 1, 1939. Mr. Sherlock Bronson, Box 644, Richmond, Va. Dear Sir: I am kindly writing asking you please not to take the stringing of bags away from Mrs. Jones, our Agent for our community. For two years I have stringing...
Letter of April 7, 1939
In Tobacco bag stringing: Life and labor in the Depression, page 1.5
MORSE BAG COMPANY East Bend, North Carolina. April 7, 1939. Mr. Sherlock Bronson, Richmond, Virginia. Dear Sir: In compliance with your request of March 28th, I am glad to give you an idea of my experience in working with tobacco bags. My mother and father,...
Letter of March 16, 1939
In Tobacco bag stringing: Life and labor in the Depression, page 1.1
Law Offices Tucker, Bronson, Satterfield & Mays State Planters Bank Building Richmond, Virginia March 16, 1939 Hon. Graham A. Barden, House of Representatives Washington, D.C. In Re: Fair Labor Standards Act. Dear Mr. Barden: I am deeply grateful to you for...
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Primary source letters lesson plan
In Tobacco bag stringing: Secondary activity two, page 1
This is one of a series of activities that will help educators use the Tobacco Bag Stringing project materials in their classrooms. Throughout the series students will learn about tobacco stringing, study primary source...
Format: lesson plan
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Reading newspapers: Reader contributions
In Educator's Guides: North Carolina Digital History, page 2.4
A learner's guide to reading letters to the editor and other reader contributions in historical newspapers.
Format: article/learner's guide
By Kathryn Walbert.
Reading primary sources: Letters
This interactive guide to reading an 18th-century letter steps through layers of questions, guiding the reader through the process of historical inquiry. This edition is one in a series of guides on reading historical primary sources.
Format: letter (multiple pages)
Tobacco bag stringing: Elementary activity four
In this activity for grades 3–5, students will read and evaluate a primary source letter from the Tobacco Bag Stringing collection. This should be done after Activity one, which is the introductory activity about tobacco bag stringing. Students will investigate the influence of technology, and its lack, on the tobacco bag stringers. They will do a role play/debate in which they will assume the roles of owners of companies and other people that were involved in the issue.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Tobacco bag stringing: Elementary activity three
In this activity for grades 3–6, students will read and evaluate primary source letters from the Tobacco Bag Stringing collection. This should be done after Activity one, which is the introductory activity about tobacco bag stringing.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Tobacco bag stringing: Life and labor in the Depression
Images and text from a report in the North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill documenting tobacco bag stringing work in North Carolina and Virginia in 1939.
Format: series (multiple pages)
Tobacco bag stringing: Secondary activity two
In this lesson, students will read and evaluate primary source letters from the Great Depression about the effects of the Fair Labor Standards Act on North Carolina's tobacco bag stringers.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Triracial segregation in Robeson County
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.7
Letter from the mayor of Pembroke, North Carolina, explaining the town council's request that a railroad company provide separate waiting rooms for each of the county's three races (white, black, and Lumbee). Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: letter/primary source