K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
A bilious fever
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.9
Excerpt from an 1850 novel in which the author describes the illness he succumbed to on a trip to Nag's Head. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Civil War army hospitals
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.9
A description of medicine, hospitals, and the work of army doctors and nurses in the U.S. Civil War.
Format: article
Civil War casualties
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.12
Historians estimate that about 620,000 Americans died in the Civil War -- almost as many as have died in all other U.S. wars combined. This article explains why.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Desegregating hospitals
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.7
Interiew with a black dentist who joined a 1963 lawsuit against the Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital in Greensboro for refusing to accept African American patients or to hire African American doctors. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Dorothea Dix Hospital
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.7
Dorothea Dix, a reformer from New England, came to North Carolina in the 1840s to campaign for a state mental hospital that would provide humane care to the mentally ill. Her efforts resulted in the construction of Dix Hill Asylum (now called Dorothea Dix Hospital) which opened in 1856.
Format: article
Dorothea Dix pleads for a state mental hospital
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.8
In this excerpt from her "memorial" to the North Carolina General Assembly, New England reformer Dorothea Dix lays out her arguments for building a state hospital for the mentally ill. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Education
In Postwar North Carolina, page 9.3
Third part of an oral history interview with Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: interview
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kristin Post.
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
The growth of tourism: Warm Springs
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.9
Advertisement for Warm Springs (now Hot Springs) in Madison County, North Carolina, from the late nineteenth century. Includes historical commentary about the region, tourism, and nineteenth-century medicine.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Origin of Disease and Medicine
A Cherokee myth recorded in the late nineteenth century.
Format: article
By James Mooney.
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Sanitariums
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.8
In the late nineteenth century, sanitariums were built to house patients with tuberculosis, which was the leading cause of death in the United States. Western North Carolina's climate made it the perfect location for sanitariums.
Format: article
The science and technology of World War II
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 5.3
For all the role of science, mathematics, and new inventions in earlier wars, no war had as profound an effect on the technologies of our current lives than World War II. And no war was as profoundly affected by science, math, and technology than World War II. This article looks at some of the key technologies developed.
Format: article
By Dr. David Mindell.