K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with migration are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

America's first people
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 2.2
These activities, designed to accompany "First Peoples" and "The Mystery of the First Americans," will enable students to explore the origins of human populations in North America.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
British migration to Roanoke: Push and pull factors
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 4.1
In this lesson, students will examine the push/pull factors that led settlers to attempt to settle Roanoke Island in the 1580s.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Discussion questions: Expanding to the west
This set of discussion questions was designed to help students understand an article about the settlement of the Piedmont region of North Carolina between 1730 and 1775.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Great Migration and North Carolina
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.5
During the Jim Crow era of the early twentieth century, more than a million African Americans left the South for northern cities, where they took advantage of economic opportunities and created thriving communities.
Format: article
By Shepherd W. McKinley and Cynthia Risser McKinley.
Immigrants' experiences in colonial North Carolina
In this lesson plan, students read two primary-source documents describing the experiences of new arrivals to North Carolina during the colonial period: One is a summary of a report written by a young Moravian settler from Pennsylvania; the other is a letter from a German immigrant. Students compare and contrast the journeys and settlement of the two groups.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Merrie olde England?
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 4.2
Many residents of Elizabethan England did not enjoy the abundance that accompanied Queen Elizabeth’s reign. The dawn of the age of exploration gripped people’s imaginations and caused many to dream of travel, and the New World offered the promise of a fresh start without the problems of the old country.
Format: article
By Charles Carlton.
Migration into and out of North Carolina: Exploring census data
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.2
Just how many people left North Carolina in the first half of the nineteenth century -- and where did they go? To answer questions like this, the best place to turn is census records. The census can't tell us why people moved, but a look at the numbers can give us a sense of the scale of the migration.
Format: activity
By David Walbert.
The mystery of the first Americans
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.2
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.1
In the second half of the twentieth century, archaeologists agreed that those “first Americans” migrated from Asia across Beringia and into North America between fourteen and twenty thousand years ago. Recently, though, new evidence has come to light that has led some archaeologists to doubt that theory and to suggest new possibilities.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina's leaders speak out on emigration
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.3
Excerpts from a speech by Governor William Miller, 1816, and from an 1833 legislative committee report, both bemoaning the lack of economic opportunities for North Carolina's citizens. Includes historical commentary.
Format: speech/primary source
"The present state of North Carolina": Making decisions
In this lesson, students read an excerpt from John Lawson's 1709 book A New Voyage to Carolina and use a graphic organizer to decide whether they would have emigrated to Carolina as a result of reading Lawson's book.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Provisions for Carolina: Comparing lists
In this lesson, students will compare and contrast two historical documents: A list of recommended provisions for colonists traveling to Virginia in 1622, and a similar list of recommended provisions for colonists traveling to Carolina in 1709. Students will infer what has changed and what has stayed the same between the publication of these two documents.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Searching for greener pastures: Out-migration in the 1800s
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.1
In the first half of the nineteenth century, a steady stream of emigration flowed from North Carolina to western states and territories. North Carolinians were pushed by a lack of economic opportunity at home and pulled by open land in the West. Only after the 1830s, when a progressive political leadership supported schools and internal improvements, did out-migration slow.
Format: article
By Donald R. Lennon and Fred D. Ragan.
Supplies for Virginia colonists, 1622
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.2
A 1622 broadside listing recommended supplies for British colonists to bring to Virginia.
Format: document/primary source
Theories of migration
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 2.1
In this lesson, students will read about and evaluate differing theories about the migration of the first people to the Americas.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.