K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Resources tagged with military are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

African American soldiers
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.9
After Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, some 180,000 African American soldiers fought for the Union cause in the Civil War.
Format: article
Allied advances in North Africa and southern Europe, 1942–1944
Allied advances in North Africa and southern Europe, 1942–1944
Format: image/map
Allied advances through France and western Germany, 1944-45
Allied advances through France and western Germany, 1944-45
Format: image/map
America needs your scrap rubber
America needs your scrap rubber
U.S. Government poster from World War II illustrating the military need for rubber.
Format: image/poster
The atomic bomb
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 9.2
This article describes the use and effects of the atomic bomb by the U.S. Army on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945.
Format: article
An authentick relation of the Battle of Alamance
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.11
Contemporary newspaper account of the Battle of Alamance, fought between Regulators and militia led by Governor William Tryon on May 16, 1771. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
B-17 Flying Fortress
B-17 Flying Fortress
Format: image/photograph
Basic training
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 6.2
Oral history interview with a North Carolina man about his experiences after being drafted into the U.S. Army in 1942. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Battle of Gettysburg
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.8
The diary of Confederate soldier Louis Leon in the first days of July 1863, describing his experiences at the Battle of Gettysburg. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
The Battle of Guilford Courthouse
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 5.9
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 7.2
During the American Revolution, on March 15, 1781, American and British armies met at Guilford Courthouse, in present-day Greensboro, North Carolina. Although the British won the battle, they lost so many troops that the battle ultimately helped the American cause. Includes a slideshow of photographs from a 2008 reenactment.
Format: article
The Battle of New Bern
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 3.5
The Battle of New Bern on March 14, 1862, won by Union General Burnside's forces, was the second of three major engagements on the North Carolina coast in the second year of the Civil War.
Format: article
The battle of Roanoke Island
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 3.3
Dispatch from Roanoke Island to northern newspapers after the Union victory in February 1862. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
The Battle of the Bulge
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 5.9
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 8.7
Oral history interview with a North Carolina World War II veteran about his experiences in the Battle of the Bulge, fought in France between December 1944 and January 1945. Includes historical background and contemporary newsreel footage.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
A black officer in an integrated Army
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.5
Interview with the black commander of white troops in an American battalion in occupied Germany after the U.S. military was desegregated. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Bombs over Goldsboro
In Postwar North Carolina, page 1.8
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.12
On January 24, 1961, a B-52 jet carrying two nuclear bombs crashed near Goldsboro, North Carolina. When one of the bombs was found, its arming mechanism had accidentally gone through all but one of the seven steps toward detonation, and a piece of the bomb containing uranium was never recovered.
Format: article
The burning of Washington
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 8.6
Report in the Raleigh Star, September 2, 1814, on the burning of Washington by the British during the War of 1812. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
The Burnside Expedition
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 3.1
Union General Ambrose Burnside led an assault on Roanoke Island in February 1862. Burnside's forces would take and hold much of the coast of North Carolina for the remainder of the war.
Format: article
Camp Bragg
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.7
This 1919 description of Fort Bragg and the process of building it during World War I was published as part of a larger book promoting Fayetteville and the surrounding area. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Civil War army hospitals
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.9
A description of medicine, hospitals, and the work of army doctors and nurses in the U.S. Civil War.
Format: article
Civil War casualties
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.12
Historians estimate that about 620,000 Americans died in the Civil War -- almost as many as have died in all other U.S. wars combined. This article explains why.
Format: article
By David Walbert.