K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with oral histories are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

1869: A report on schools in North Carolina
In this lesson, students look at a report on the status of education in North Carolina in 1869 and discuss the reasons given then for why the Governor and Legislature should support educating North Carolina's children. They are provided an opportunity to compare and contrast the 1869 document against their own ideas about the civic duty to attend school through age sixteen and its relative value to the state and the country.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Victoria Schaefer.
Analyzing children's letters to Mrs. Roosevelt
Students will analyze letters that children wrote to Eleanor Roosevelt during the Great Depression.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Social Studies)
By Angie Panel Holthausen.
Brown versus Board of Education: Rhetoric and realities
In this lesson, students will listen to three oral histories that shed light on political and personal reactions toward the 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown versus Board of Education. Includes a teacher's guide as well as the oral history audio excerpts and transcripts.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Children at work: Exposing child labor in the cotton mills of the Carolinas
In this lesson, students will learn about the use of child labor in the cotton mills of the Carolinas during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They will learn what life was like for a child worker and then write an investigative news report exposing the practice of child labor in the mills, using quotations from oral histories with former child mill workers and photographs of child laborers taken by social reform photographer Lewis Hine.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Civil rights protests and dilemmas
In this lesson students explore well-known civil rights protests then listen to two oral histories of individuals who protested in their own way to promote equality for African Americans. Students specifically will consider personal risks involved in protest.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Conduct your own oral history project
In this unit, students will research the moviegoing experience in the early 20th century by analyzing primary sources. They will then conduct oral history interviews to learn about what it was like to go to the movies in various generations.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 and 12 Social Studies)
By Lisa Speaker.
Connecting oral history to geography: The changes of Madison County
In North Carolina maps, page 2.4
In this lesson, students ground the story of a county in corresponding maps. Students will show an understanding of the geography surrounding an oral history.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jennifer Job.
Cotton mills from differing perspectives: Critically analyzing primary documents
In this lesson, students will read two primary source documents: a 1909 pamphlet exposing the use of child labor in the cotton mills of North Carolina, and a weekly newsletter published by the mill companies. Students will also listen to oral history excerpts from mill workers to gain a third perspective. In a critical analysis, students will identify the audiences for both documents, speculate on the motivations of their authors, and examine the historical importance of each document.
Format: lesson plan
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
De facto vs. de jure segregation
This lesson will help students understand the difference between de facto and de jure segregation. Students will listen to three oral history excerpts and discuss the experiences of segregation described in each. As a follow-up activity, students will brainstorm solutions to both de facto and de jure segregation.
Format: lesson plan (grade 10–12 Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Desegregating public schools: Integrated vs. neighborhood schools
In this lesson, students will learn about the history of the "separate but equal" U.S. school system and the 1971 Swann case which forced Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools to integrate. Students will examine the pros and cons of integration achieved through busing, and will write an argumentative essay drawing on information from oral histories.
Format: lesson plan (grade 10–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Effects of civic action
In this lesson, secondary students will analyze primary source materials to investigate how 4-H clubs made an impact on the home front in completing projects that supported the war effort during World War II. This lesson should be taught at the end of a World War II unit.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Experiences of the Civil Rights Movement: A roundtable project
This activity allows students to participate in a roundtable discussion by taking on the persona of someone who lived and experienced the Civil Rights Movement. By participating in a role playing simulation, students are more able to achieve higher-level thinking skills and, as a result, hopefully be able to think more critically about the Civil Rights Era.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Kathleen Caldwell.
Exploring first-person female narratives related to Sherman's march to the sea
This lesson plan uses first-person narratives from the Documenting the American South collection to demonstrate differences in perspective related to historical events, in this case, Sherman's march to the sea. It encourages students to compare the views of two southern ladies with that of a Union soldier.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
Exploring the 1835 NC Constitutional Convention
This internet scavenger hunt allows students to read the actual proceedings of the 1835 Constitutional Convention while they discover for themselves some of the significant amendments that were made. The activity also sets the foundation for class discussions about why the state Constitution was amended in 1835 and what impact the amendments had on religious groups, free blacks, and American Indians.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Barbara Jean.
Eyewitness to the flood
In this lesson, students will listen to oral history excerpts from Hurricane Floyd survivors and contrast their experiences with the experiences of the characters in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Family story with research
Using the book, When The Legends Die and a Native American story-telling unit, students gather a family story of their own.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Eric Broer.
Feed a fighter
In this lesson students will examine “Additional Helps for the 4-H Mobilization for Victory Program,” a Cooperative Extension Work document from the Green 'N' Growing collection at Special Collections Research Center at North Carolina State University Libraries. The document will help students understand the efforts civilians underwent to support military efforts in World War II.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Lisa Stamey.
Folklife
Students will learn North Carolina folklore, traditions, war activities, local legends, superstitions, food preparation traditions, art, songs and dances which are unique to the area.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Carolyn Early.
Fugitive Slave Law simulation
Students face the critical issue of the Fugitive Slave Law that gave Southerners the right to regain their runaway slaves and return them to bondage. It is also considered by many to have contributed to growing sectionalism in the U.S. and eventually the Civil War. In order to take on the roles of historical actors, students will examine primary source documents from the Documenting the American South collection and critique arguments in favor and opposed to the law.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
Good medicine
Students will examine changes in technology, medicine, and health that took place in North Carolina between 1870 and 1930 and construct products and ideas which demonstrate understanding of how these changes impacted people living in North Carolina at that time. To achieve these goals, students will employ the eight intelligences of Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligences Theory.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies)
By Leslie Ramsey.