K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Resources tagged with plantations are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Diary of a planter
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.3
Excerpt from the diary of Henry W. Harrington, Jr., a plantation owner in Richmond County, North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
A forced migration
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.3
The first Africans, brought to America through forced migration, came as indentured servants to Jamestown, Virginia, in 1619. Africans brought to the colonies in later years were bought and sold as slaves. At the time of the American Revolution, most of the enslaved people in North Carolina lived in the eastern part of the colony and the majority lived on large plantations, where their work was critical to the state’s cash crops and economy.
Format: article
By Jennifer Farley.
A forced migration: Reading lesson
In this lesson plan, students read an article about the slave trade in West Africa, which caused the kidnapping of millions of free West Africans by slave traders. The lesson plan includes reading strategies designed to prepare students for end-of-grade reading test.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Graphic organizer: Janet Schaw on American agriculture
This graphic organizer will aid students' comprehension as they read a diary excerpt about agricultural practices in the Carolinas on the eve of the American Revolution.
Format: chart/lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Janet Schaw on American agriculture
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.3
Excerpt from the diary of a Scottish lady traveling in North Carolina on the eve of the American Revolution. She describes, and harshly criticizes, the farming practices she finds in the colonies. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
Managing a plantation: Expenses
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.12
Page from an account book kept by Duncan Cameron, a wealthy North Carolina planter, listing his business with a Petersburg merchant in 1841–42. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Managing a plantation: Property
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.13
Excerpt from the papers of Duncan Cameron, a wealthy North Carolina planter, listing property on his plantations, with notes of those that needed special attention. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Managing a plantation: Slaves
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 3.14
List of slaves on the Cameron plantation in Orange County, North Carolina, 1844. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
Probate inventory of James and Anne Pollard, Tyrrell County, 1750
In Colonial North Carolina, page 7.7
Probate inventory of a wealthy couple in colonial North Carolina. Includes explanations and photographs of items listed.
Format: inventory
Probate inventory of Richard Blackledge, Craven County, 1777
In Colonial North Carolina, page 7.9
Probate inventory of a wealthy plantation owner in colonial North Carolina. Includes explanations and photographs of items listed.
Format: inventory
Setting up a plantation
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.14
Excerpts from the papers of Paul Cameron, detailing the costs of setting up a new plantation in Greene County, Alabama. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Will of William Cartright, Sr., 1733
In Colonial North Carolina, page 7.6
Will of a wealthy plantation owner in colonial North Carolina. Includes explanations and photographs of items listed.
Format: will