K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with politics are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

The 1950 Senate campaign
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.6
Campaign poster from the 1950 U.S. Senate election in North Carolina, in which Willis Smith played to white voters' racism in defeating Frank Porter Graham. Includes historical background.
Format: poster/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The 1984 Senate campaign
In Recent North Carolina, page 2.4
Time magazine article about the 1984 U.S. Senate race between incumbent Jesse Helms and then-governor Jim Hunt, which was the most expensive non-presidential election in the nation's history to that point.
Format: magazine
Address to the Colored People of North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.7
1870 broadside urging African Americans to support Governor William Woods Holden, then facing impeachment for his use of the militia to stop Ku Klux Klan violence. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poster/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Alexander Martin (1740–1807)
Alexander Martin was a North Carolina delegate to the Constitutional Convention, fought in the American Revolution, and served as governor and in the state legislature.
Format: biography
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Archibald Murphey
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.4
Archibald Debow Murphey (1777–1832) was a North Carolina state senator and later a Superior Court judge who fought for a comprehensive system of public education, construction of canals and roads, and other progressive reforms.
Format: biography
Archibald Murphey calls for better inland navigation
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.7
Excerpt from Archibald Murphey’s Report to the Committee on Inland Navigation in which he calls for the government to invest in the state’s internal transportation system as a way to break their dependency on neighboring states and to increase land values, population and state revenue.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
The Bonus Army
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 1.5
In 1932, in the depths of the Great Depression, thousands of World War I veterans set up camp in Washington, D.C., to lobby Congress to pay them their army bonus early. The Army dispersed them violently, and the public outcry contributed to President Hoover's failure to win reelection that year.
Format: article
A call for independence
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.9
After the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, North Carolina's fourth Provincial Congress met at Halifax in April 1776, and resolved that the colony's delegates to the Continental Congress should support a move to declare independence.
Format: article
Canova's statue of Washington
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.8
In 1815, at a time when the state of North Carolina was unwilling to spend money on roads or schools, the General Assembly spent as much as $60,000 on a statue of George Washington for the State Capitol.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Pauline S. Johnson.
A capital in the "wilderness"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 1.3
In 1792, the North Carolina General Assembly voted to place a permanent state capital in Wake County. Joel Lane sold 1,000 acres of land to the state, and in the years that followed, the city of Raleigh was planned and built.
Format: article
The Carter years
In Recent North Carolina, page 1.1
Overview of United States history in the late 1970s, including economic troubles, the energy crisis, the Cold War, and the Iran hostage crisis.
Format: book
The Compromise of 1850
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.4
The Compromise of 1850, passed by Congress after the Mexican War, temporarily appeased both northerners and southerners who debated the expansion of slavery.
Format: article
The compromise of 1877
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.8
After the disputed presidential election of 1876, Democrats in Congress agreed to certify a majority vote for Republican Rutherford B. Hayes if Republicans agreed to end military reconstruction.
Format: article
Congress considers an inquiry into textile strikes
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 8.6
Newspaper article about a congressional debate about southern textile strikes, 1929. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Conservative opposition
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.2
Newspaper editorial attacking the Reconstruction-era Republican majority in North Carolina as incompetent and corrupt. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
The cost of Tryon Palace
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 1.8
Table detailing the expenses of building Tryon Palace, the residence of the colonial governor at New Bern, North Carolina, in 1770. Includes historical commentary about why these expenses infuriated many colonists.
Format: document/primary source
Creed of a Rioter
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.13
During the American Revolution, Patriots who supported the war and independence committed frequent acts of violence against Loyalists and suspected Loyalists. This satirical essay was written in 1776 by an anonymous North Carolina Patriot disturbed by the extent of the violence.
Format: essay/primary source
Debating war with Britain: Against the war
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 8.5
Article from the Carolina Federal Republican of Raleigh, published just after Congress declared war on Great Britain in 1812, arguing against the war. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Debating war with Britain: For the war
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 8.4
Article from the Raleigh Star, published just after Congress declared war on Great Britain in 1812, arguing in support of the war. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source