K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Criminal law and reform
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.6
In the early nineteenth century, North Carolina had more than two dozen crimes punishable by death, and the state kept a variety of physical and humiliating punishments on the books as well. Reformers tried to make the criminal code clearer and more humane, but they made little progress before the Civil War.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Dorothea Dix Hospital
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.7
Dorothea Dix, a reformer from New England, came to North Carolina in the 1840s to campaign for a state mental hospital that would provide humane care to the mentally ill. Her efforts resulted in the construction of Dix Hill Asylum (now called Dorothea Dix Hospital) which opened in 1856.
Format: article
Dorothea Dix pleads for a state mental hospital
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.8
In this excerpt from her "memorial" to the North Carolina General Assembly, New England reformer Dorothea Dix lays out her arguments for building a state hospital for the mentally ill. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Ending child labor in North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.1
The movement to ban child labor began in the early 1900s and slowly turned the tide of public opinion. As mill work changed in the 1920s, mills employed fewer children. North Carolina finally regulated child labor in 1933.
Format: article
Eugenics in North Carolina
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.9
Between 1933 and 1974, the state of North Carolina's Eugenics Board had the power to order sterilization of mentally ill, feeble-minded, or epileptic persons.
Format: article
The Fair Labor Standards Act
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.4
The Fair Labor Standards Act, signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 25, 1938, revolutionized the federal government's oversight of industry. Although it directly impacted only about a quarter of American workers, in affected industries, it banned oppressive child labor, limited the workweek to 44 hours, and established a minimum wage of 25 cents an hour.
Format: article
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Industrialization and Progressive Reform in the Craft Revival
In this lesson plan, originally published on the Craft Revival website, students will analyze the process of making a hobby into a job. They will explore Craft Revival work environments, representations of industrial work environments, and data regarding Craft Revival work. To close the activity, students write a journal entry comparing Craft Revival and industrial work experiences.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 Social Studies)
By Patrick Velde.
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Raleigh Female Benevolent Society
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.9
Constitution and managers' report of the Raleigh Female Benevolent Society, 1823, describing the society's efforts to educate poor children and provide work for poor women. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Ratifying the amendments
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.4
In 1835, a convention passed amendments to the North Carolina state constitution. In this activity, students map votes for ratification by county and explain the patterns they see.
Format: activity
By David Walbert.
Reform and a new era
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.1
Brief history of the Progressive Era in the United States, including the administrations and reforms of presidents Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson.
Format: article
Reform movements across the United States
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.2
In the 1830s and 1840s, a wave of social and political reform swept the United States. Various groups of reformers, often inspired by religion, worked to expand the vote, promote equal rights for women, improve labor conditions, build free public schools, limit alcohol use, and improve treatment of criminals and the insane.
Format: article
Republican rule
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 10.1
Newspaper editorial praising the accomplishments of the Republican Party in North Carolina during Reconstruction. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Statewide Prohibition
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.5
On May 26, 1908, by a referendum vote of 62 percent to 38 percent, North Carolina became the first southern state to enact statewide prohibition of alcoholic beverages.
Format: article
Whigs and Democrats
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.1
After the War of 1812, the two-party system of Federalists and Democratic-Republicans collapsed, and an era of one-party rule was known as the Era of Good Feelings. But new conflicts arose over the presidency of Andrew Jackson, the Second Bank of the United States, and tariffs, and two new parties, the Whigs and the Democrats, emerged. In North Carolina, the Whigs gained power in the 1830s and began a period of reform.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Women's clubs
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.2
Excerpt from the published minutes of the North Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs, a statewide organization that coordinated the activities of various clubs. Includes historical commentary on women's activities as reformers during the Progressive Era.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Workplace safety
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 2.3
Excerpt of legislation passed by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1933 to protect the health and safety of industrial workers. Includes historical background.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.