K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Archibald Murphey proposes a system of public education
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 4.6
Report of a joint legislative committee, 1817, laying out a complete plan for statewide public education, including primary schools, academies, and the University of North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Brown versus Board of Education: Rhetoric and realities
In this lesson, students will listen to three oral histories that shed light on political and personal reactions toward the 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown versus Board of Education. Includes a teacher's guide as well as the oral history audio excerpts and transcripts.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Charlotte Hawkins Brown's rules for school
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.10
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.8
Rules for students from a book by Charlotte Hawkins Brown, founder of the Palmer Memorial Institute. Includes historical background.
Format: book/primary source
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
A free school in Beaufort
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.1
Excerpt from the will of James Winwight, 1744, leaving money to build a free public school and hire a teacher. Includes historical commentary.
Format: will/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Great Depression: Impact over time
In this lesson students listen to oral history excerpts from Stan Hyatt from Madison County and evaluate how the Great Depression affected one North Carolina family over time.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Improving school houses
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 2.3
Report by the The Woman's Association for the Betterment of Public School Houses, 1906, on improvements made to the Snow Hill School in Greene County, North Carolina. Describes conditions in rural schools at the time. Includes photographs and historical background.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Learning in colonial Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.8
During the late 1600s and early 1700s, education in Carolina was largely informal. Most children learned by watching and imitating parents and older community members. The sons of the wealthy were sent away to schools in other colonies or in England. The first efforts to provide formal education in Carolina were made by religious groups — the Quakers, the Baptists, and the Presbyterians.
Format: article
By Betty Dishong Renfer.
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Raleigh Female Benevolent Society
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.9
Constitution and managers' report of the Raleigh Female Benevolent Society, 1823, describing the society's efforts to educate poor children and provide work for poor women. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Reading questions: Learning in colonial Carolina
This set of questions was designed to accompany an article about education in colonial North Carolina.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Rules for students and teachers
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.2
Fictional description by Calvin Wiley (1819–1887) of the "Old Field School," a typical rural school of the late eighteenth century. The author lists rules that students were expected to obey, with punshments for disobedience. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
School for Freed People
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 8.3
During and after the Civil War, a movement to provide education to freed slaves began to take hold in the South. Despite the resistance of many whites, reformers such as The Reverend Samuel S. Ashley campaigned for the free education of all children, both black and white, in North Carolina.
Format: article
By Betty Dishong Renfer and Alex Sandifer.
Understanding Charlotte Hawkins Brown's rules for school
In this lesson plan, students read a primary source document that lists rules for proper school behavior, written by Charlotte Hawkins Brown, a teacher who dedicated her life to improving the educational opportunities of African Americans in North Carolina in the early 20th century. Students analyze the rules in the context of the racial politics of the era and in the context of progressive education.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
World War I propaganda posters
U.S. Government propaganda posters spelled out the reasons for American involvement in World War I and encouraged all Americans to help in the war effort.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)