K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Archaeobotany
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.6
Students will use pictures of seeds, an activity sheet, and a graph to identify seven seeds and the conditions in which they grow. They will also infer ancient plant use by interpreting archaeobotanical samples and determine changing plant use by Native North Carolinians by interpreting a graph of seed frequency over time.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 and 8 Science and Social Studies)
Archaeological soils
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.11
Students will determine components of a soil sample and evaluate how archaeologists use soils to interpret sites.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Science)
The Biltmore Forest School
In North Carolina in the New South, page 4.8
The pioneering Biltmore Forest School emerged from George Vanderbilt's desire for scientific management of the forests around Biltmore Estate.
Format: article
Food for fighters
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.1
To feed the 3.5 million men in active service by the end of World War II, the military needed massive quantities of food in small, lightweight, durable packages. The government spent millions of dollars developing various types of rations for soldiers and sailors. This article includes a U.S. Government film about the science and technology behind military rations.
Format: exhibit
By David Walbert.
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
A guided journey into the past
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.7
In their study of archaeological resource conservation, students will use guided imagery to discover and judge an alternative way to enjoy artifacts without removing them from archaeological sites.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 Visual Arts Education, English Language Arts, and Social Studies)
Intrigue of the Past
Lesson plans and essays for teachers and students explore North Carolina's past before European contact. Designed for grades four through eight, the web edition of this book covers fundamental concepts, processes, and issues of archaeology, and describes the peoples and cultures of the Paleoindian, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian periods.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The needs of animals
In this lesson plan first grade students will examine photographs of 4-H club members with animals from North Carolina. They will make observations from the visual material to build an understanding of the needs of animals. They will begin to learn that these needs have remained the same in different times.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1 Science)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Pottery traditions
In Intrigue of the Past, page 4.5
Students will learn how Indian people of North Carolina made and used coiled pottery, summarize why archaeologists study pottery, and make and decorate a replica of a North Carolina coiled pot.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 8 Visual Arts Education and Social Studies)
A revolution in agriculture
In North Carolina in the New South, page 1.2
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.6
Science and technology made farmers more productive in the nineteenth century, but added expenses that drove small farmers off the land.
Format: article
The science and technology of World War II
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 5.3
For all the role of science, mathematics, and new inventions in earlier wars, no war had as profound an effect on the technologies of our current lives than World War II. And no war was as profoundly affected by science, math, and technology than World War II. This article looks at some of the key technologies developed.
Format: article
By Dr. David Mindell.
Scientific inquiry
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.8
In their study of scientific inquiry, students will use an activity sheet to make inferences about what activities go on at different places in school (desk, locker, etc.) and form an hypothesis about how space is used. They will also simulate how archaeologists learn about past people by designing and conducting a research project.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–9 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Shifting coastlines
In Intrigue of the Past, page 4.3
In their study of North Carolina's changing coastline during the Paleoindian and Archaic periods, students will determine the positions of the coastline at different times and decide what types of archaeological information has been lost due to rising sea levels.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 and 8 Science and Social Studies)
The space race
In Postwar North Carolina, page 1.9
An overview and timeline of the U.S. space program from the Soviet launch of Sputnik in 1957 through the 1969–72 moon landings. Includes links to NASA's websites about each mission.
Format: article
Sputnik and Explorer
In Postwar North Carolina, page 1.6
On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched the world's first intercontinental ballistic missile and inserted a beach ball-sized satellite into earth orbit. This article tells the story of the launch and of reactions in the United States.
Format: article
Stratigraphy and cross-dating
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.3
Students will use an activity sheet to interpret archaeological strata using the law of superposition and apply cross-dating to determine the age of other artifacts.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Science)
Tree-ring dating
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.5
In their study of dendrochronology, students use activity sheets and a discussion to apply principles of dendrochronology to determine a tree's age and to recognize climatic variation. They will also analyze and experience how archaeologists can sometimes use tree rings to date archaeological evidence and study past climates.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 Science)