K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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The 1950 Senate campaign
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.6
Campaign poster from the 1950 U.S. Senate election in North Carolina, in which Willis Smith played to white voters' racism in defeating Frank Porter Graham. Includes historical background.
Format: poster/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The birth of "Jim Crow"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.1
During the years that followed Reconstruction, and especially after 1890, state governments in the South adopted segregationist laws mandating separation of the races in nearly every aspect of everyday life. This system was known informally as "Jim Crow."
Format: book
Black codes
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.9
Excerpts from the North Carolina Revised Code of 1855 with respect to free and enslaved African Americans, known as the "black codes." Includes historical commentary.
Format: legislation/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
The Bouquet
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.2
Story by Charles Waddell Chesnutt. Includes reading questions.
Format: story/primary source
Civil rights protests and dilemmas
In this lesson students explore well-known civil rights protests then listen to two oral histories of individuals who protested in their own way to promote equality for African Americans. Students specifically will consider personal risks involved in protest.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
De facto vs. de jure segregation
This lesson will help students understand the difference between de facto and de jure segregation. Students will listen to three oral history excerpts and discuss the experiences of segregation described in each. As a follow-up activity, students will brainstorm solutions to both de facto and de jure segregation.
Format: lesson plan (grade 10–12 Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Desegregating public schools: Integrated vs. neighborhood schools
In this lesson, students will learn about the history of the "separate but equal" U.S. school system and the 1971 Swann case which forced Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools to integrate. Students will examine the pros and cons of integration achieved through busing, and will write an argumentative essay drawing on information from oral histories.
Format: lesson plan (grade 10–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Face to face with segregation: African American marines at Camp Lejune
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 6.3
Service in the Marine Corps during World War II brought African Americans to North Carolina's Camp Lejune, where they faced discrimination that many from the North were unfamiliar with.
Format: article
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Negotiated segregation in Salem
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.6
In Salem, North Carolina, white Moravians and African Americans found ways to live, work, and worship separately and together.
Format: article
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Racial discrimination in the Army
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 6.5
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 5.5
Interviews with African American veterans of World War II about their experiences as soldiers. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
A record of school desegregation: Conduct your own oral history project
In this unit, students will research the history of school desegregation and will use their knowledge to conduct oral history interviews with community members. Students will reflect on the experience through writing.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
School desegregation pioneers
In this lesson, students will learn about the challenges faced by the first students to desegregate Southern schools. Students will hear oral histories telling the story of desegregation pioneers from Alabama and North Carolina and critically analyze images of school desegregation. They will synthesize the information by writing a narrative from the point of view of a black student desegregating a white school.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 Social Studies)
By Dayna Durbin Gleaves.
Teaching about North Carolina American Indians
This web edition is drawn from a teachers institute curriculum enrichment project on North Carolina American Indian Studies conducted by the North Carolina Humanities Council. Resources include best practices for teaching about American Indians, suggestions for curriculum integration, webliographies, and lesson plans about North Carolina American Indians.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Triracial segregation in Robeson County
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.3
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.7
Letter from the mayor of Pembroke, North Carolina, explaining the town council's request that a railroad company provide separate waiting rooms for each of the county's three races (white, black, and Lumbee). Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: letter/primary source