K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Resources tagged with slavery are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Slaves escape to Union lines
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.3
Federal Writers' Project interview with former slave Mary Barbour. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Slaves under the overseer's whip
Slaves under the overseer's whip
Format: image/illustration
Slaves working in 17th-century Virginia
Slaves working in 17th-century Virginia
Format: image/painting
Social divisions in antebellum North Carolina
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 1.2
An overview of the social divisions of antebellum North Carolina: large planters and smaller-scale slaveholders, small farmers and skilled laborers, tenant farmers and unskilled laborers, free blacks, and slaves.
Format: article
Spain and America: From Reconquest to Conquest
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 3.1
In 1491, no European knew that North and South America existed. By 1550, Spain -- a small kingdom that had not even existed a century earlier -- controlled the better part of two continents and had become the most powerful nation in Europe. In half a century of brave exploration and brutal conquest, both Europe and America were changed forever.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Stagville bricks
Stagville bricks
Bricks in the chimney of a slave house at Horton Grove at Historic Stagville, North Carolina. These bricks were made on-site by enslaved people. In order to maximize output the bricks were taken from their molds for firing in a kiln when not completely dry....
Format: image/photograph
Stagville Plantation
Stagville Plantation
Horton Grove at Historic Stagville, North Carolina, located in parts of what are now Orange, Durham, Wake, and Granville counties. Established in 1787 by the Bennehan and Cameron families, Stagville was the largest plantation in North Carolina. In 1860 more...
Format: image/photograph
Stagville slave house interior
Stagville slave house interior
Interior view of a slave house at Horton Grove at Historic Stagville, North Carolina. The framed bed would likely have been used by adults, either parents or grandparents. The furniture depicted is not original to the house. Stagville plantation is located...
Format: image/photograph
Stagville slave house sleeping area
Stagville slave house sleeping area
Interior view of the lower floor of a slave house at Horton Grove at Historic Stagville, North Carolina. The small sleeping area on the floor would likely have accommodated two children sleeping head to foot. Each room had a fireplace. Stagville plantation...
Format: image/photograph
Stagville slave quarters
Stagville slave quarters
Slave quarters at Horton Grove at Historic Stagville, North Carolina, located in parts of what are now Orange, Durham, Wake, and Granville counties. Established in 1787 by the Bennehan and Cameron families, Stagville was the largest plantation in North Carolina....
Format: image/photograph
Statue in Cartagena, Colombia
Statue in Cartagena, Colombia
A statue of a man holding a long stick sits atop a stone pedestal. This statue may represent an African slave brought to Latin America. Cartagena was one of the largest ports for the arrival of slaves brought from Africa during the colonial period. While Brazil...
Format: image/photograph
Stowage of the British slave ship Brookes under the regulated slave trade act of 1788
Stowage of the British slave ship Brookes under the regulated slave trade act of 1788
Illustration showing deck plans and cross sections of British slave ship Brookes.
Format: image/illustration
Teaching about North Carolina American Indians
This web edition is drawn from a teachers institute curriculum enrichment project on North Carolina American Indian Studies conducted by the North Carolina Humanities Council. Resources include best practices for teaching about American Indians, suggestions for curriculum integration, webliographies, and lesson plans about North Carolina American Indians.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The transformation of cacao into chocolate
Transforming cacao into chocolate is a labor-intensive process that involves many steps. This slideshow tells the story of that process, focusing on one cacao plantation in the Barlovento region of Venezuela.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
UNC dismisses Benjamin Hedrick
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.7
Minutes of a meeting of University of North Carolina faculty in which they agreed to the dismissal of professor Benjamin Hedrick, who had published his views supporting the Republican candidate for President.
Format: document/primary source
The Underground Railroad
The Underground Railroad
The Underground Railroad, painted by Charles T. Webber for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, celebrates abolitionists' efforts to end slavery. It depicts Levi Coffin, his wife Catharine, and Hannah Haddock, all friends of the artist, leading...
Format: image/painting
Underground Railroad routes
Underground Railroad routes
Format: image/map
Venture Smith describes his enslavement
In Colonial North Carolina, page 4.5
Excerpt from a late eighteenth-century book by a freed slave in Connecticut. Describes his capture and enslavement at the age of six. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Shane Freeman.
A Virginian responds to Dunmore's Proclamation
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.6
Response to a 1775 proclamation by the Royal Governor of Virginia offering freedom to slaves and indentured servants who agreed to serve in the king's army. The writer argues that the governor does not have slaves' best interests at heart. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
"What we are in justice entitled to"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 8.1
Jourdon Anderson, an ex- Tennessee slave, declines his former master's invitation to return as a laborer on his plantation.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.