K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with slavery are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

The African American experience in NC after Reconstruction
The documents included in this lesson come from The North Carolina Experience collection of Documenting the American South and specifically focus on African Americans and race relations in the early 20th century. The lesson juxtaposes accounts that relate to both the positive improvements of black society and arguments against advancement. Combined, these primary sources and the accompanying lesson plan could be used as a Document Based Question (DBQ) in an AP US history course.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
Africans before captivity: Graphic organizer
This activity provides a way for students to further their comprehension as they read an article about the regions of Africa from which most American slaves originated. Students will complete a graphic organizer and answer a series of questions.
Format: worksheet/lesson plan (grade 9–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Creating museum exhibits to understand slavery
In this lesson students will analyze primary source documents from the Built Heritage collection at the North Carolina State University. They will use their textbooks, knowledge of history, observation skills, and inference to draw conclusions about slavery in North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 Social Studies)
By Loretta Wilson.
Educator's guide: Spain and America
In Two worlds: Educator's guide, page 3.1
The article "Spain and America: From Reconquest to Conquest" introduces a lot of information and a number of issues that may be new to students. These suggestions will help you use the article in a way that best fits the needs of your class.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Exploring the church in the southern black community
Students explore the Documenting the American South Collection titled, the “Church in the Southern Black Community.” Beginning with a historian's interpretation of the primary sources that make up the collection, students search the collection for evidence to describe the experiences of African Americans living in the south during the Antebellum through the Reconstruction Period centering on their community churches. The activity culminates in student presentations of a digital scrap book.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 and 10–12 Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
"For What Is a Mother Responsible?" -- Idealized motherhood vs. the realities of motherhood in antebellum North Carolina
In this lesson for grade 8, students analyze a newspaper article about motherhood from a North Carolina newspaper in 1845 and compare it to descriptions of motherhood from other contemporary sources. Students will also compare these antebellum descriptions to the modern debates over mothers' roles in American society.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Kathryn Walbert.
A forced migration: Reading lesson
In this lesson plan, students read an article about the slave trade in West Africa, which caused the kidnapping of millions of free West Africans by slave traders. The lesson plan includes reading strategies designed to prepare students for end-of-grade reading test.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
"Forward" to the great escape
In this lesson, students will read a primary source document from Documenting the American South and examine a painting by Jacob Lawrence to understand the conditions of the underground railroad before the Civil War. Students will then create a painting and a narrative related to the underground railroad.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Visual Arts Education and Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
Freedom with Harriet: Life on the Underground Railroad
This lesson for grades 6–8 will help students understand the experiences of slaves in the South who sought freedom via the Underground Railroad. Students will analyze a painting and create a living tableau that reflects the issues and emotions the painting evokes.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Dianne Harlow.
Fugitive Slave Law simulation
Students face the critical issue of the Fugitive Slave Law that gave Southerners the right to regain their runaway slaves and return them to bondage. It is also considered by many to have contributed to growing sectionalism in the U.S. and eventually the Civil War. In order to take on the roles of historical actors, students will examine primary source documents from the Documenting the American South collection and critique arguments in favor and opposed to the law.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Meghan Mcglinn.
George Washington and Frederick Douglass letters: Recognizing point of view and bias
In Where English and history meet: A collaboration guide, page 4
This lesson uses two letters written by famous individuals. Frederick Douglass, a well-known former slave who became a leader of the American abolition movement, escaped from slavery in Maryland to freedom in New York in 1838. George Washington was a large slaveholder in Virginia (as well as the first president of the United States).
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Karen Cobb Carroll, Ph.D., NBCT.
Inside and outside: Paradox of the box
This lesson serves to introduce students to symbolism (the box), to the literary element paradox, and to the abstract notion of ambiguity (freedom vs. confinement). It is designed for 2nd and 3rd graders, but may be adapted for use with upper elementary or early middle school grades.
Format: lesson plan (grade 2–6 English Language Arts)
By Edie McDowell.
Interracial "harmony" and the Great Awakening
The students will be introduced to two episodes in 19th-century American history, around the time of the Great Awakening, that show glimpses of some positive and negative consequences of interracial interaction in a religious context. The students will examine primary sources from the Documenting the American South collection to then be able to write a "sermon" from the perspective of a southern itinerant preacher during the Great Awakening arguing for or against religion as a cure for the social ill of racism and slavery.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
An introduction to slave narratives: Harriet Jacobs' Life of a Slave Girl
In this lesson, students will learn about the life experiences of slaves in the United States during the 1800s by reading the story of a North Carolina slave woman who eventually escaped.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Joe Hooten.
Jonkonnu celebrations in North Carolina and beyond
In this lesson plan, students read two articles about Jonkonnu, an African American and Afro-Caribbean celebration among slave populations with origins in West Africa. Students complete a graphic organizer comparing Jonkonnu in North Carolina, Belize, and Jamaica.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 and 11 Social Studies)
By Jamie Lathan.
"Land and Work in Carolina" teaching strategies
A variety of suggested activities for use with an article that explains the key elements of feudalism, with a focus on how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Lunsford Lane: A slave in North Carolina who buys his freedom
In this lesson plan, students read a primary source document to learn about the life of Lunsford Lane, a slave who worked in the city of Raleigh, North Carolina. Students answer questions about Lane based on his memoir to help them understand the details of his life.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By John Schaefer and Victoria Schaefer.
The Middle Passage according to Olaudah Equiano
Olaudah Equiano is perhaps one of the most well-known abolitionist writers and former slaves to live in America. His narrative has been digitized as a part of the Documenting the American South North American Slave Narratives collection. His vivid retelling of his trip onboard a slave ship bound for the New World illustrates the horrific and dehumanizing experience.
Format: lesson plan (grade 11–12 Social Studies)
By Regina Wooten.
Mountain dialect: Reading between the spoken lines
This lesson plan uses Chapter 13 of Our Southern Highlanders as a jumping-off point to help students achieve social studies and English language arts objectives while developing an appreciation of the uniqueness of regional speech patterns, the complexities of ethnographic encounter, and the need to interrogate primary sources carefully to identify potential biases and misinformation in them. Historical content includes American slavery, the turn of the century, and the Great Depression.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Kathryn Walbert.
North Carolina maps
A collection of lesson plans for grades K-12 centered on historic maps of North Carolina
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)