K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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The 2004 presidential election in historical context
Historian William E. Leuchtenburg talks about past presidential elections and how the 2004 election fits or defies precedents.
By Kathryn Walbert.
Barrier islands
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.8
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students examine the difference between simple overwash barrier islands and complex barrier islands. They also learn more about the island-building process and the effect this process can have on daily life on barrier islands.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Buffalo Soldiers
In this lesson, students will learn about Buffalo Soldiers using the Blacks in the West Mini Page. Students will compare what they learn from the Mini Page with Bob Marley’s song "Buffalo Soldiers." Then students will choose another group of people or a social movement to compare the Buffalo Soldiers to, similar to the way Marley compared them to Rastafarians, and they will write their own song lyrics to demonstrate the connection. This lesson allows students to make connections between different groups across history.
Format: lesson plan
By Summer Pennell.
Canning for country and community
In this lesson plan, students will use primary source documents to evaluate the technological challenges of food preservation in the 30s and 40s, compare food preservation in the first half of the twentieth century with today, and consider the political role of food in the community.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Melissa Thibault.
Changing communities: Past vs. future
In this lesson, students will learn about the geographical, political, and technological issues that have influenced change in mountain communities using oral histories by Madison County residents. They will learn about the history of road building in the North Carolina mountains and the relatively recent decision to connect two halves of interstate highway in Madison County. They will compare and contrast the negative and positive changes that road construction has brought to the region, and listen to oral histories of locals who have experienced both good and bad effects.
Format: lesson plan
The coastal dilemma
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.15
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks. Students look at examples of shoreline erosion. They reflect on the impact this erosion can have on human life on the Outer Banks.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Election 2008
Educational resources to help students and teachers understand the 2008 elections.
Format: (multiple pages)
Election 2012
Educational resources to help students and teachers understand the 2012 elections.
Format: (multiple pages)
Estuarine shorelines behind simple overwash barrier islands
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.13
This lesson is part of chapter one in the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students take another look at simple overwash and complex barrier islands. They examine more closely how overwash and inlet processes are crucial to the long-term maintenance of barrier islands and how these processes can affect human life.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Families in colonial North Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.7
In colonial families, the father had absolute authority over his family, and wives and children were expected to do as they were told. And everyone, even young children, worked to sustain the family.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.
The forest people
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.3
Paleoindian culture died out across North America by 8000 BC. Archaeologists say this was bound to happen. The Ice Age had ended, the megafauna were extinct, and the boreal forests faded as deciduous ones spread across the East in the warmer climate. Faced with significant environmental changes, the Native Americans adapted. Archaeologists call their way of life and the time in which they lived Archaic.
Human responses to eroding shorelines
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.16
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students look at efforts that are taken to prevent shoreline erosion. These include building hardened structures along shorelines. Students examine the effects these efforts have on barrier islands.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
Map of South Asia
Map of South Asia
Format: image/map
Marriage in colonial North Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.6
In the colonial period, how and when people got married depended on whether they were indentured servants, slaves, free laborers, or wealthy people. Many marriages were informal and validated by the community rather than by a legal license.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.
North Carolina Coastal Plain province
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.7
This lesson is part of chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students compare and contrast the Northern Coastal province and the Southern Coastal province.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.
The pathfinders
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.2
An essay covering the pathfinders of the Paleoindian Period. Learn about the trek across Beringia and the lifeways of these early American Indians.
Picturing Vietnam
This lesson plan is intended to introduce students to Vietnam’s geography, climate, culture, history, natural history, arts, economics, and government. Students will view a collection of documentary photographs and use these for making logical observations, drawing conclusions, and as a basis for creative writing.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7 English Language Arts, Information Skills, and Social Studies)
By Edie McDowell.
The pottery makers
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.4
Archaeologists do a bit of shrugging when asked about the Woodland—that time and lifeway tucked between 1000 BC and AD 1000. Some things they readily understand, but others leave them wondering.
Sea-level change and coastal dynamics
In Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks, page 1.3
This lesson is a part chapter one of the unit "Coastal processes and conflicts: North Carolina's Outer Banks." Students learn about how the sea level has changed over several thousand years. They also look at sea level changes from the past century and infer what sort of affects these changes have — or will have — on the life of citizens in coastal areas.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Science and Social Studies)
By Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea Ames, and Karen Dawkins.