K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Africans before captivity: Graphic organizer
This activity provides a way for students to further their comprehension as they read an article about the regions of Africa from which most American slaves originated. Students will complete a graphic organizer and answer a series of questions.
Format: worksheet/lesson plan (grade 9–12 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Analyzing historical maps of North Carolina
In this lesson students will analyze historical maps and will use their knowledge of history, observation skills, and inference to draw conclusions about the events that affected the geographic development of North Carolina over time.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Loretta Wilson.
Anticipation guide: "A Little Kingdom in Carolina"
A learner's guide to the article "A Little Kingdom in Carolina," this activity will support student comprehension.
Format: worksheet/learner's guide
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Anticipation guide: A royal colony
This activity presents students with a series of true/false statements about the early Carolina colony. Students respond to the statements before and after reading an article about the changes in the Carolina colony in its first fifty years, as it was divided into North and South Carolina and changed from a proprietary colony to a royal colony.
Format: /lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Archaeobotany
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.6
Students will use pictures of seeds, an activity sheet, and a graph to identify seven seeds and the conditions in which they grow. They will also infer ancient plant use by interpreting archaeobotanical samples and determine changing plant use by Native North Carolinians by interpreting a graph of seed frequency over time.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 and 8 Science and Social Studies)
Archaeological context
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.5
In their study of context, students will use a game and a discussion to demonstrate the importance of artifacts in context for learning about past people.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 Social Studies)
Archaeology as a career
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.2
In their study of archaeology as a career, students will read essays and complete an activity to gain an understanding of and appreciation for the career of a professional archaeologist.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 Guidance)
Artifact classification
In Intrigue of the Past, page 2.4
Students will use pictures of artifacts or objects from a teaching kit to classify artifacts and answer questions about the lifeways of a group of historic Native Americans.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 Social Studies)
Artifact ethics
In Intrigue of the Past, page 5.5
In their study of archaeological issues students will use ethical dilemmas to examine their own values and beliefs about archaeological site protection. They will also evaluate possible actions they might take regarding site and artifact protection.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–5 Guidance and Social Studies)
Brown versus Board of Education: Rhetoric and realities
In this lesson, students will listen to three oral histories that shed light on political and personal reactions toward the 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown versus Board of Education. Includes a teacher's guide as well as the oral history audio excerpts and transcripts.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Canning for country and community
In this lesson plan, students will use primary source documents to evaluate the technological challenges of food preservation in the 30s and 40s, compare food preservation in the first half of the twentieth century with today, and consider the political role of food in the community.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Melissa Thibault.
The Carolina colony: Comparing three perspectives
In this lesson, students compare three different primary sources written by early colonists and consider the reasons the colonists had for moving to Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Children and families in North Carolina
In this lesson plan, elementary students will analyze photographs of children from North Carolina provided by the Green ‘N’ Growing collection from the Special Collections Research Center at North Carolina State University. They will investigate how individuals and families are similar and different, and to begin to acquire an understanding of change over time.
Format: lesson plan (grade K–3 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
Chronology: The time of my life
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.6
In their study of chronology the students will use personal timelines and an activity sheet to demonstrate the importance of intact information to achieve accuracy, and compare and contrast their timelines with the chronological information contained in a stratified archaeological site.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
Civil rights protests and dilemmas
In this lesson students explore well-known civil rights protests then listen to two oral histories of individuals who protested in their own way to promote equality for African Americans. Students specifically will consider personal risks involved in protest.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Civil rights wax museum project
In this lesson plan, students will choose African Americans prominent in the Civil Rights Movement and research aspects of their lives. They will create timelines of their subjects' lives and a speech about their subjects, emphasizing why they are remembered today.
Format: lesson plan (grade 5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Sabrina Lewandowski.
Classification and attributes
In Intrigue of the Past, page 1.7
In their study of classification and attributes, students will use “doohickey kits” to classify objects based on their attributes, and explain that scientists and specifically archaeologists use classification to help answer research questions.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 Social Studies)
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Craft Revival and economic change
In this lesson plan, originally published on the Craft Revival website, students will interpret photographs and artifacts as representations of western North Carolina’s economy at the turn of the century. They will also analyze historical census data and produce a visual web that will represent the changing nature of the economy of western North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–12 Social Studies)
By Patrick Velde.
Creating museum exhibits to understand slavery
In this lesson students will analyze primary source documents from the Built Heritage collection at the North Carolina State University. They will use their textbooks, knowledge of history, observation skills, and inference to draw conclusions about slavery in North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8–10 Social Studies)
By Loretta Wilson.