K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Resources tagged with soldiers are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

African American soldiers
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.9
After Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, some 180,000 African American soldiers fought for the Union cause in the Civil War.
Format: article
Basic training
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 6.2
Oral history interview with a North Carolina man about his experiences after being drafted into the U.S. Army in 1942. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Battle of Gettysburg
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.8
The diary of Confederate soldier Louis Leon in the first days of July 1863, describing his experiences at the Battle of Gettysburg. Includes historical commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
The Battle of the Bulge
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 5.9
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 8.7
Oral history interview with a North Carolina World War II veteran about his experiences in the Battle of the Bulge, fought in France between December 1944 and January 1945. Includes historical background and contemporary newsreel footage.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
A civil war at home: Treatment of Unionists
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.11
Excerpt from the memoir of W. B. Younce, an Ashe County man who was drafted into the Confederate army and deserted. He describes the conditions on the home front, particularly the treatment of Unionists. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood and David Walbert.
Civil War uniforms
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.3
Article describes the clothing and baggage of northern and southern soldiers during the U.S. Civil War. Includes video of a Civil War reenactment.
Format: article
Diary of a doughboy
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.9
Excerpts from a diary written by Willard Newton, who served in the U.S. Army in France during World War I. Describes trench warfare and conditions along the front. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Enduring amputation
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.10
Letter from a Civil War soldier to his brother about how he is getting along with his artificial leg. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Enlisting
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 6.1
Oral history interview with a North Carolina man about his experience enlisting in the U.S. Navy after Pearl Harbor. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Ensign Worth Bagley
In North Carolina in the New South, page 6.5
Worth Bagley of Raleigh, North Carolina, was the only U.S. naval officer killed in the Spanish-American War.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
The experiences of black soldiers
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 6.4
This UNC-TV documentary looks at the experiences of black North Carolinians in World War II.
Format: documentary
Face to face with segregation: African American marines at Camp Lejune
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 6.3
Service in the Marine Corps during World War II brought African Americans to North Carolina's Camp Lejune, where they faced discrimination that many from the North were unfamiliar with.
Format: article
Food for fighters
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.1
To feed the 3.5 million men in active service by the end of World War II, the military needed massive quantities of food in small, lightweight, durable packages. The government spent millions of dollars developing various types of rations for soldiers and sailors. This article includes a U.S. Government film about the science and technology behind military rations.
Format: exhibit
By David Walbert.
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
"I am sorry to tell that some of our brave boys has got killed"
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.13
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.4
Letter written from Confederate soldier M. W. Parris to his wife, Jane, during the Civil War. He writes about the fighting and the men who have been killed or wounded. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Iowa Royster on the march into Pennsylvania
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.7
Letter from a North Carolina soldier two days before the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
John Chavis
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 3.10
John Chavis (1762?–1838), a free African American living in North Carolina, was a widely respected minister and teacher with long-reaching influence on both whites and African Americans.
Format: biography
Landing in Europe
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 5.7
Oral history interviews with veterans of World War II who participated in the D-Day landings in France in 1944. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
A letter home from the American Expeditionary Force
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 3.10
Letter from Robert Hanes, who was stationed in France during World War I, to his wife Mildred at home in North Carolina. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
"Liberty to slaves": The black response
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.4
During the American Revolution, some black people living in the colonies fought for the British and some fought for the revolutionaries. Their actions during the war were often decided by what they believed would best help them throw off the shackles of slavery. Most believed that victory by the British would bring an end to their enslavement.
Format: article
By Jeffrey J. Crow.