K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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African Americans get the vote in eastern North Carolina
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.9
After the Civil War, African American communities in eastern North Carolina, having already tasted freedom during the war, were ready to fight for political rights.
Format: article
Amending the U.S. Constitution
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 9.8
Text of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution, passed after the Civil War to abolish slavery and to guarantee the civil rights of African Americans.
Format: constitution/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Gertrude Weil
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.4
Biography of Gertrude Weil (1879–1971) of Goldsboro, who led the fight for women's suffrage in North Carolina.
Format: biography
By Jill Molloy and L. Maren Wood.
Gertrude Weil congratulates — and consoles — suffragists
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.11
Letter from Gertrude Weil, president of North Carolina's Equal Suffrage Association, to supporters after the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified by enough states to become part of the Constitution -- but failed to pass in North Carolina.
Format: letter/primary source
Gertrude Weil urges suffragists to action
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.9
Letter from Gertrude Weil, president of the North Carolina Equal Suffrage League, to supporters on the eve of the North Carolina General Assembly's vote on the Nineteenth Amendment. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Lillian Exum Clement
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.12
Biography of Lillian Exum Clement, the first woman elected to the North Carolina General Assembly.
Format: article
The long struggle for women's suffrage
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.2
The 19th Amendment not only gave women the right to enfranchisement in all elections, and thus a say in government, it also legitimized women's participation in all areas of society. This article tells the story of the suffrage movement from the mid-nineteenth century to the passing of the amendment in 1920.
Format: article
North Carolina and the women's suffrage amendment
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.10
Article tells the story of the political battle in North Carolina over ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.
Format: article
The North Carolina Equal Suffrage League
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.5
Report of the statewide organization working to obtain voting rights for women, 1917. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Our Idea of Nothing at All
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.7
Poem by by Alice Duer Miller attacking a U.S. Senator from North Carolina who opposed women's suffrage. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poetry/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Suffrage: The changing role of women
In this lesson, students use oral history excerpts and photographs to learn about the women's suffrage movement in the United States from a variety of perspectives.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Timeline of Women's Suffrage
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.1
A timeline of the major events in the long campaign for women's voting rights, from the nation's independence in 1776 to North Carolina's ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1971.
Format: timeline
By Jill Molloy.
Votes for Women
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.8
This poster, published by the North American Woman Suffrage Association, counters opponents arguments about why women shouldn’t be given the right to vote.
Format: poster/primary source
Why We Oppose Votes for Men
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.6
Satirical column by Alice Duer Miller, challenging people opposed to women's suffrage. Includes historical commentary.
Format: poster/primary source