K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

LEARN NC was a program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education from 1997 – 2013. It provided lesson plans, professional development, and innovative web resources to support teachers, build community, and improve K-12 education in North Carolina. Learn NC is no longer supported by the School of Education – this is a historical archive of their website.

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Resources tagged with tobacco are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Barning the tobacco
Barning the tobacco
Two men "barning" tobacco, packing it for storage in a barn.
Format: image/photograph
Bonsack cigarette rolling machine
Bonsack cigarette rolling machine
Format: image/photograph
The Bonsack machine and labor unrest
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.7
When the Duke tobacco company adopted the Bonsack machine for rolling cigarettes, workers who had rolled cigarettes by hand were thrown out of work, and their replacements made less money.
Format: article
Bright leaf tobacco
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.10
Tobacco had always been a major crop in North Carolina, but not until the accidental development of the “bright leaf” variety in 1839 did the market for the product really start booming.
Format: article
Bright leaf tobacco
Bright leaf tobacco
Bright leaf tobacco grows on a farm in North Carolina's Piedmont. Pilot Mountain stands in the background to the right.
Format: image/photograph
Child labor in North Carolina's textile mills
The photographs of Lewis Hine show the lives and work of children in North Carolina's textile mill villages in the first decades of the twentieth century.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Dukes of Durham
In North Carolina in the New South, page 2.7
After the Civil War, Orange County farmer Washington Duke put everything he had into growing tobacco. From farming he quickly expanded into manufacturing, and by the end of the nineteenth century, his son controlled the largest tobacco industry in the world.
Format: article
Excavating Occaneechi Town: An archaeology primer
Republished with permission from the Research Laboratories of Archaeology, the Archaeology Primer uses photographs of the excavations at Occaneechi Town to introduce fundamental concepts of archaeology. The primer provides an introduction to the methods of archaeology and to some common types of artifacts, and prepares students to participate in an electronic archaeological dig.
Format: slideshow (multiple pages)
Factory at Duke Homestead
Factory at Duke Homestead
Second tobacco factory at Duke Homestead.
Format: image/photograph
A faded advertisement on a barn in Greene County, North Carolina
A faded advertisement on a barn in Greene County, North Carolina
This is a faded advertisement on a tobacco barn in Greene County, North Carolina.
Format: image/photograph
The founding of Virginia
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.1
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.3
England planted its first successful North American colony at Jamestown in 1607, but settlers fought Indians and disease, and the colony grew slowly. By the end of the seventeenth century, Virginia had established tobacco as its main crop, a representative government, and slavery as a dominant system of labor.
Format: article
By L. Maren Wood.
General statement of Sherlock Bronson
In Tobacco bag stringing: Life and labor in the Depression, page 1.6
Virginia-Carolina Service Corporation General Office 1413-15-17 East Franklin Street Richmond, Virginia April 13, 1939. Hon. Graham A. Barden, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. Dear Mr. Barden: Upon my return to Richmond after my interview with you...
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Growing tobacco
In Postwar North Carolina, page 2.5
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 8.9
This short documentary shows the process of harvesting, curing, and selling tobacco, from farm to auction. It was filmed at Duke Homestead State Historic Site in Durham, North Carolina, during the 2009 Tobacco Harvest Festival.
Format: documentary
Harvesting and selling tobacco
This short documentary shows the process of harvesting, curing, and selling tobacco, from farm to auction. Filmed at Duke Homestead State Historic Site in Durham, North Carolina, during the 2009 Tobacco Harvest Festival.
Format: video
Harvesting tobacco
Harvesting tobacco
Men work to harvest tobacco by hand. A mule pulls a wagon or cart.
Format: image/photograph
Inventions in the tobacco industry
In North Carolina in the New South, page 3.6
Several inventions made the tobacco industry so highly profitable in the late nineteenth century, including machines for tying strings on bags and for rolling cigarettes.
Format: bibliography
Key industries: Tobacco
In Recent North Carolina, page 3.9
An overview of the recent history of the tobacco industry in North Carolina.
Format: article