K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Cargo manifests of Confederate blockade runners
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 4.4
Cargo manifests of various ships that ran the Union blockade to bring goods from Nassau, in the Bahamas, to Wilmington, North Carolina, during the Civil War. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The Charter of Carolina (1663)
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.4
In the Charter of Carolina, King Charles II of England granted the eight men known as the Lords Proprietors rights to the land that became North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Primary source includes historical commentary.
Format: charter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Committees of Safety
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 2.9
Excerpts from the minutes of the Committees of Safety set up in North Carolina towns and counties, 1775, for the purpose of enforcing the trade boycott against Britain. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Diary of a journey of Moravians
First-hand account of the journey of twelve Moravian brothers from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania to Bethabara, North Carolina in 1753.
Format: diary (multiple pages)
The First Provincial Congress
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 2.6
After the Boston Tea Party in December 1773, Britain retaliated with a series of punitive measures that colonists called the "intolerable acts." In August 1774, North Carolina's colonial leaders met at New Bern to set out their princples, to plan further opposition to Britain, and to choose delegates to a Continental Congress. This excerpt from the proceedings of that First Provincial Congress includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
The forest people
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.3
Paleoindian culture died out across North America by 8000 BC. Archaeologists say this was bound to happen. The Ice Age had ended, the megafauna were extinct, and the boreal forests faded as deciduous ones spread across the East in the warmer climate. Faced with significant environmental changes, the Native Americans adapted. Archaeologists call their way of life and the time in which they lived Archaic.
Intrigue of the Past
Lesson plans and essays for teachers and students explore North Carolina's past before European contact. Designed for grades four through eight, the web edition of this book covers fundamental concepts, processes, and issues of archaeology, and describes the peoples and cultures of the Paleoindian, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian periods.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina history: Grade 4 educator's guide
This educator's guide provides teaching suggestions designed to facilitate using the digital North Carolina history textbook with fourth-grade students.
Format: (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction (1860–1876). Topics include debates over secession, battles and strategies, the war in North Carolina, the soldier's experience, the home front, freedom and civil rights for former slaves, Reconstruction, and the "redemption" of the state by conservatives.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Of the inlets and havens of this country
In Colonial North Carolina, page 2.7
Excerpt from John Lawson's 1709 A New Voyage to Carolina detailing the geography of North Carolina's coast. Includes historical commentary and notes about how the coastline has changed since the colonial period.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
The present state of Carolina [people, climate]
In Colonial North Carolina, page 2.1
Excerpt from John Lawson's 1709 A New Voyage to Carolina describing (and mostly praising) the European and native inhabitants, weather, and natural resources of Carolina, as well as what settlers should bring with them from Europe. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert.
Quick study: Archaic Period
A “cheat sheet” covering basic information about the Archaic Period and its key characteristics.
Quick study: Woodland Period
A “cheat sheet” covering basic information about the Woodland Period and its key characteristics.
Report of Vice-Consul R. E. Heide on the Resources, Trade and Commerce of North Carolina (1875)
An 1875 report on the population, geography, industry, and natural resources of North Carolina, with particular attention to shipping, navigation, and the production of naval stores.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Revolutionary North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the era of the American Revolution. Topics include the Regulators, the resistance to Great Britain, the War for Indpendence, and the creation of new governments.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Spain and America: From Reconquest to Conquest
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 3.1
In 1491, no European knew that North and South America existed. By 1550, Spain -- a small kingdom that had not even existed a century earlier -- controlled the better part of two continents and had become the most powerful nation in Europe. In half a century of brave exploration and brutal conquest, both Europe and America were changed forever.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
Summary of a report sent to Bethlehem
In Diary of a journey of Moravians, page 16
In Colonial North Carolina, page 5.4
In 1733, a group of Moravians — a Protestant Christian denomination originating in fourteenth-century Bohemia — moved from Europe to North America seeking freedom from religious persecution. In 1753, a group of twelve single brothers left Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, for a new settlement in North Carolina. Their report back to Bethlehem describes what they found in their new home. Includes historical commentary.
Format: report
The Union blockade
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.5
At the beginning of the U.S. Civil War, Union forces blockaded Confederate ports to stop exports of cotton and imports of war supplies.
Format: article
The village farmers
In Intrigue of the Past, page 3.5
North Carolina sat on a crossroads by AD 1000. Cultural ideas from other places breezed through it and around it: how to decorate pottery, how to orient political and social life, how to honor the dead, how to structure towns.