K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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1835 amendments to the North Carolina Constitution
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 11.3
Amendments to the North Carolina state constitution passed in 1835. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Gertrude Weil urges suffragists to action
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.9
Letter from Gertrude Weil, president of the North Carolina Equal Suffrage League, to supporters on the eve of the North Carolina General Assembly's vote on the Nineteenth Amendment. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Land and work in Carolina
In Colonial North Carolina, page 1.10
This article explains the key elements of feudalism, including its hierarchy of personal relationships and system of landholding, and how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: article
By David Walbert.
"Land and Work in Carolina" teaching strategies
A variety of suggested activities for use with an article that explains the key elements of feudalism, with a focus on how those elements evolved into the systems of labor and land ownership seen in colonial North Carolina.
Format: lesson plan (grade 8 Social Studies)
By Pauline S. Johnson.
The long struggle for women's suffrage
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.2
The 19th Amendment not only gave women the right to enfranchisement in all elections, and thus a say in government, it also legitimized women's participation in all areas of society. This article tells the story of the suffrage movement from the mid-nineteenth century to the passing of the amendment in 1920.
Format: article
The North Carolina Constitution and Declaration of Rights
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.14
Full text of the 1776 state constitution of North Carolina, with historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
The North Carolina Equal Suffrage League
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.5
Report of the statewide organization working to obtain voting rights for women, 1917. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
North Carolina in the early 20th century
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the first decades of the twentieth century (1900–1929). Topics include changes in technology and transportation, Progressive Era reforms, World War I, women's suffrage, Jim Crow and African American life, the cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and labor unrest, and the Gastonia stirke of 1929.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New Nation
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the early national period (1790–1836). Topics include the development of state government and political parties, agriculture, the Great Revival, education, the gold rush, the growth of slavery, Cherokee Removal, and battles over internal improvements and reform.
Format: book (multiple pages)
North Carolina in the New South
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the decades after the Civil War (1870–1900). Topics include changes in agriculture, the growth of cities and industry, the experiences of farmers and mill workers, education, cultural changes, politics and political activism, and the Wilmington Race Riot.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Origins of the Civil Rights Movement
In Postwar North Carolina, page 3.1
An overview of the Civil Rights Movement from the end of World War II through the Civil Rights Act of 1957, including school desegregation and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.
Format: article
Plans for democracy
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.12
Instructions to delegates from Orange County, North Carolina, to the Provinicial Congress in November 1776, about what sort of state constitution they should support. Includes historical commentary.
Format: document/primary source
Postwar North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the postwar era (1945–1975).
Format: book (multiple pages)
Race in her lifetime
In this lesson, students will use oral histories to trace the life of Rebecca Clark, an African American who was born in rural Orange County just before the Depression and witnessed the changes in civil rights over the years.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
Revolutionary North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the era of the American Revolution. Topics include the Regulators, the resistance to Great Britain, the War for Indpendence, and the creation of new governments.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Selma-to-Montgomery March
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.11
The Selma-to-Montgomery March for voting rights ended three weeks -- and three events -- that represented the political and emotional peak of the modern civil rights movement.
Format: article
The struggle for voting rights
In Postwar North Carolina, page 5.10
Beginning in 1961, civil rights activists launched voter registration campaigns in the deep South, culminating in the Mississippi "Freedom Summer" in 1964. More than a thousand white college students from the North helped, and the violent response drew the nation's attention to the disfranchisement of African Americans.
Format: book
The Suffrage Amendment
In North Carolina in the New South, page 8.7
Amendment to the North Carolina state constitution, passed 1899, adding a literacy test and a poll tax requirement for voting but a "grandfather clause" that allowed the requirements to be used specifically to disfranchise blacks. Includes historical commentary.
Format: constitution/primary source
Suffrage: The changing role of women
In this lesson, students use oral history excerpts and photographs to learn about the women's suffrage movement in the United States from a variety of perspectives.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)