K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Battle of Guilford Courthouse
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 5.9
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 7.2
During the American Revolution, on March 15, 1781, American and British armies met at Guilford Courthouse, in present-day Greensboro, North Carolina. Although the British won the battle, they lost so many troops that the battle ultimately helped the American cause. Includes a slideshow of photographs from a 2008 reenactment.
Format: article
The Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.7
In February 1776, Patriot militia companies fought an army of Loyalists, mainly Scottish Highlanders, at Moore's Creek Bridge near Wilmington, North Carolina. The Patriot victory convinced colonial leaders to push for independence.
Format: article
The burning of Washington
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 8.6
Report in the Raleigh Star, September 2, 1814, on the burning of Washington by the British during the War of 1812. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by David Walbert and L. Maren Wood.
Civil War army hospitals
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 5.9
A description of medicine, hospitals, and the work of army doctors and nurses in the U.S. Civil War.
Format: article
David Fanning and the Tory War of 1781
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 5.10
During the American Revolution, Patriots and Loyalists fought in the North Carolina backcountry. In 1781, David Fanning, commanding the Loyalist forces of five counties, terrorized residents of the Piedmont.
Format: article
Debating war with Britain: Against the war
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 8.5
Article from the Carolina Federal Republican of Raleigh, published just after Congress declared war on Great Britain in 1812, arguing against the war. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Debating war with Britain: For the war
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 8.4
Article from the Raleigh Star, published just after Congress declared war on Great Britain in 1812, arguing in support of the war. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
"The duty of colored citizens to their country"
In North Carolina in the New South, page 6.3
Sermon urging African Americans to support the war effort against Spain and to enroll in the U.S. army, thereby making a good statement for themselves and demonstrating their loyalty, even the face of continued suffering.
Format: speech/primary source
Enlisting
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 6.1
Oral history interview with a North Carolina man about his experience enlisting in the U.S. Navy after Pearl Harbor. Includes historical commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Feed a fighter
In this lesson students will examine “Additional Helps for the 4-H Mobilization for Victory Program,” a Cooperative Extension Work document from the Green 'N' Growing collection at Special Collections Research Center at North Carolina State University Libraries. The document will help students understand the efforts civilians underwent to support military efforts in World War II.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Lisa Stamey.
The Great Depression and World War II
Primary sources and readings explore the history of North Carolina and the United States during the Great Depression and World War II (1929–1945).
Format: book (multiple pages)
The Korean War
In Postwar North Carolina, page 1.3
The Korean War (1948–1953), the first military conflict of the Cold War, pitted the U.S. and its allies against the Soviet Union and other communist nations.
Format: article
"Liberty to slaves": The black response
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.4
During the American Revolution, some black people living in the colonies fought for the British and some fought for the revolutionaries. Their actions during the war were often decided by what they believed would best help them throw off the shackles of slavery. Most believed that victory by the British would bring an end to their enslavement.
Format: article
By Jeffrey J. Crow.
Living with the bomb
In Postwar North Carolina, page 1.4
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 8.8
After the Soviet Union tested its first atomic bomb in 1948, the U.S. Government produced civil defense films explaining the true nature of atomic bombs and demonstrating techniques for surviving an atomic attack. This article includes two civil defense films, film of the first hydrogen bomb test, and a Life magazine article about a honeymoon in a bomb shelter.
Format: exhibit
By David Walbert.
Lord Dunmore's Proclamation
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 3.5
Proclamation by the Royal Governor of Virginia, 1775, offering freedom to slaves and indentured servants who fought in the king's army against the colonial uprising. Includes historical commentary.
Format: proclamation
The Mexican-American War
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 7.2
Brief history of the war between Mexico and the United States (1846–48) and the expansion of the U.S. under President James Polk.
Format: article
Mobilizing for war
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 4.6
The U.S. entry into World War II required rapid and massive buildup of the armed forces and industrial production to supply the war effort. this page includes a clip from a documentary produced by the U.S. Government in 1942 showing scenes of wartime production.
Format: documentary
North and South in 1861
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 2.1
A comparison of the two sides at the beginning of the Civil War, focusing on their preparedness for war.
Format: book
North Carolina History: A Sampler
A sample of the more than 800 pages of our digital textbook for North Carolina history, including background readings, various kinds of primary sources, and multimedia. Also includes an overview of the textbook and how to use it.
Format: (multiple pages)