K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

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4-H and Home Demonstration Work during World War II
In The Great Depression and World War II, page 8.3
During the years of World War II, North Carolina women were led by Home Demonstration and extension agents in programs to increase food production and preservation. 4-H clubs also aided the war effort, primarily through the "Food for Victory" program and the "Feed a Fighter" campaign.
Format: article
By Amy Manor.
Alice Caudle talks about mill work
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 7.5
WPA Federal Writers Project interview with a North Carolia woman about her life and work in textile mills in the early twentieth century. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Antebellum North Carolina
Primary sources and readings explore North Carolina in the antebellum period (1830–1860). Topics include slavery, daily life, agriculture, industry, technology, and the arts, as well as the events leading to secession and civil war.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Charlotte Hawkins Brown
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.9
Charlotte Hawkins Brown (1883–1961) founded the Palmer Memorial Institute, a school for African Americans, and devoted her life to the improvement of the African American community's social standing.
Format: biography
Charlotte Hawkins Brown's rules for school
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 5.10
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.8
Rules for students from a book by Charlotte Hawkins Brown, founder of the Palmer Memorial Institute. Includes historical background.
Format: book/primary source
Cherokee women
In Prehistory, contact, and the Lost Colony, page 2.8
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 2.2
Before the arrival of Europeans in North America, women enjoyed a major role in the family life, economy, and government of the Cherokee Indians. Cherokee society was organized according to a matrilineal kinship system, and women were the heads of households. Women also did most of the farming and had a voice in government.
Format: article/primary source
By Theda Perdue.
Colonial cooking and foodways
In Colonial North Carolina, page 6.15
A reenactor demonstrates cooking over an open fire.
Format: video
Colonial North Carolina
Colonial North Carolina from the establishment of the Carolina in 1663 to the eve of the American Revolution in 1763. Compares the original vision for the colony with the way it actually developed. Covers the people who settled North Carolina; the growth of institutions, trade, and slavery; the impact of colonization on American Indians; and significant events such as Culpeper's Rebellion, the Tuscarora War, and the French and Indian Wars.
Format: book (multiple pages)
Diary of a farm wife
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.4
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 3.3
April 1854 Page from Penelope Alderman diary. Mond. 3. Wove some. Mr. A. ploughing and...
Format: diary/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Domestic work in the nineteenth century
In North Carolina in the New South, page 5.11
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 8.3
Videos of junior reenactors at Duke Homestead State Historic Site in Durham, North Carolina, show cooking indoors and outdoors and the work involved in doing laundry by hand.
Format: video
The duties of a young woman
In Antebellum North Carolina, page 2.5
Even in her early youth, what essential aid may an affectionate daughter render to a mother, "cumbered," perhaps, and overburthened with the cares of her household. By her assiduous attentions towards her younger brothers and sisters, by the aid she may give...
Format: speech/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Edenton "Tea Party"
In Revolutionary North Carolina, page 2.7
In October 1774, several prominent women of Edenton gathered at the home of Elizabeth King, with Penelope Barker presiding, to sign a petition supporting the American cause. This letter describing the event, which came to be known as the Edenton Tea Party, appeared in a London newspaper. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source
Elizabeth, A Colored Minister of the Gospel, Born in Slavery
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 3.9
In this excerpt from her 1863 memoir, Elizabeth (her last name, if she had one, is unknown), a former slave, tells of her conversion to Christianity and her work as a minister. She faced opposition to her ministry both because she was African American and because she was a woman. Includes historical commentary.
Format: book/primary source
Equal pay for equal work
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 4.3
Pamphlet, published in 1918 by a teacher named Julia Dameron, pointing out that women teachers were routinely paid less than men and calling for change. Includes historical commentary.
Format: pamphlet/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
The Equal Rights Amendment
In Postwar North Carolina, page 8.6
Oral history interview with activist Martha McKay about the ERA's defeat in North Carolina. Includes historical background.
Format: interview/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
Farmville's choice
In this lesson, students will learn about rural life in North Carolina at the turn of the century. Home demonstration and 4H clubs implemented many programs to help people learn better farming techniques, ways of preserving food, and taking care of the home. Several North Carolina leaders went to great lengths to ensure the success of these programs. In part of this activity, students help the town of Farmville dedicate a monument to one of those people.
Format: lesson plan (multiple pages)
A female raid
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 6.7
In North Carolina History: A Sampler, page 4.4
Newspaper coverage of a raid on local stores by Confederate soldier's wives in Salisbury, North Carolina on March 18, 1863. Includes historical commentary.
Format: newspaper/primary source
The "flapper"
In North Carolina in the early 20th century, page 6.11
Contemporary description of the "flapper" and the changes in American culture in the 1920s. Includes historical background and commentary.
Format: magazine/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by L. Maren Wood.
"For What Is a Mother Responsible?"
In North Carolina in the New Nation, page 5.5
1845 newspaper editorial about a mother's responsibilities for her children's education and character. Includes historical commentary.
Format: article/primary source
Commentary and sidebar notes by Kathryn Walbert.
The Freedmen's Bureau
In North Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction, page 8.5
Report by Louisa Jacobs on her and her mother Harriet's work to educate freed people in Savannah, Georgia, after the Civil War. Includes historical commentary.
Format: letter/primary source