K-12 Teaching and Learning From the UNC School of Education

Important Announcement about Online Courses and LEARN NC.

Important Message about LEARN NC

LEARN NC is evaluating its role in the current online education environment as it relates directly to the mission of UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education (UNC-CH SOE). We plan to look at our ability to facilitate the transmission of the best research coming out of UNC-CH SOE and other campus partners to support classroom teachers across North Carolina. We will begin by evaluating our existing faculty and student involvement with various NC public schools to determine what might be useful to share with you.

Don’t worry! The lesson plans, articles, and textbooks you use and love aren’t going away. They are simply being moved into the new LEARN NC Digital Archive. While we are moving away from a focus on publishing, we know it’s important that educators have access to these kinds of resources. These resources will be preserved on our website for the foreseeable future. That said, we’re directing our resources into our newest efforts, so we won’t be adding to the archive or updating its contents. This means that as the North Carolina Standard Course of Study changes in the future, we won’t be re-aligning resources. Our full-text and tag searches should make it possible for you to find exactly what you need, regardless of standards alignment.

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Resources tagged with writing are also tagged with these keywords. Select one to narrow your search or to find interdisciplinary resources.

A “defining moment” in editorial writing
Students will be introduced to the definition mode of writing. Students will learn to define a particular subject by responding in an editorial format. Students will first compose an editorial graphic organizer, which will aid in composing a completed editorial using the writing process. This lesson includes modifications for a Novice Low Limited English student.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Susan Brooks and Carrie Mabry.
Dear Peter Rabbit
Students will identify formal language and sentence structures in friendly letters. They will use similar formal language and style to create friendly letters to other story book characters.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 English Language Arts and Information Skills)
By Caroline Annas, Elizabeth Gibson, and Stephanie Johnson.
Love Letters: Using imagery to convey feelings
After listening to Arnold Adoff's Love Letters, students will write and share their own love letters. This lesson is especially fun around Valentine's Day.
Format: lesson plan (grade 2–4 English Language Arts)
By Jennifer Reid.
The Alphabet Tree
After reading The Alphabet Tree by Leo Lionni to students, the students will retell the events on a flow map. Then using Kid Pix software, each child will choose an event, illustrate it, and write a caption for it. The students will then put their events in order in a Kid Pix Slide Show they can present to the class.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1 English Language Arts)
By Jody Shaughnessy.
The Legend of the Blue Bonnet
Students will create their own version/retelling of The Legend of the Blue Bonnet by Tomie dePaola
Format: lesson plan (grade 2 English Language Arts)
By Shari Peacock.
Los adjetivos con el verbo “estar”
Students will learn adjectives of emotion with the verb estar and make a booklet illustrating the new vocabulary.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–12 Second Languages)
By Karen Hayworth.
The ABCs of the Three Little Pigs
This lesson uses a familiar fairy tale to teach writing. It is designed to emphasize using varied sentence patterns in writing.
Format: lesson plan (grade 6–7 English Language Arts)
By Penny Canipe.
Action chains
Students learn to elaborate on an event in a narrative by expanding their sentences into action chains. Expanding single actions into an action chain provides the reader with a more detailed picture of an event in a narrative.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts)
By DPI Writing Strategies.
Adding emotions to your story
One way to make stories even better is to show emotions and not just tell them. In this lesson, students will use actions, gestures, and facial expressions to act out emotions.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts)
By DPI Writing Strategies.
Along the Trail of Tears
A part of history is often forgotten when teaching younger students. This is the relocation of the Cherokee Indians when the white settlers wanted their property. The US Government moved whole groups of Indians under harsh conditions. This trip became known as the Trail of Tears. Using this as a background students will explore and experiment with persuasive writing as they try to express the position of Cherokee leaders.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4–5 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Glenda Bullard.
Analyzing author style using sentence combining
This activity should be completed before reading the essay “Beach People, Mountain People” by Suzanne Britt. Students will combine three sets of kernel sentences based on the first paragraph of Britt's writing. They will then compare their sentences to Britt's. The class will discuss what sentence combining strategy or strategies they used and observe how Britt varies her sentences.
Format: lesson plan (grade 9–10 English Language Arts)
By Vickie Smith.
Animal adjectives
Students will describe animals as they review nouns and verbs associated with these animals. They will learn to use adjectives as they describe the animals. They will use this knowledge to write their stories about animals.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1–2 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Anita Baldwin, Ann Loftis, and Genevieve Kiser.
Animals on the move
Students will choose an animal, draw the animal, write a sentence naming their animal and write a sentence about what their animal can do using inventive as well as conventional spelling.
Format: lesson plan (grade K Computer/Technology Skills, English Language Arts, and Information Skills)
By Anita Baldwin, Ann Loftis, and Genevieve Kiser.
Apple story writing with a buddy
Students will write a story with a buddy through the use of a computer. Practicing computer skills and correct sentence formation will be emphasized.
Format: lesson plan (grade 1 Computer/Technology Skills and English Language Arts)
By Patsy Oswald.
Appositive action
Appositives are descriptive phrases, set off by commas, that modify a noun or noun phrase. Using appositives helps writers create sentences that are smoother and less choppy. In this lesson, students will learn to combine 2 or more descriptive sentences and action sentences into one sentence with an appositive phrase.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–5 English Language Arts)
By DPI Writing Strategies.
Awesome action words
Good writers use precise verbs to make stories interesting and vivid. In this lesson, students will learn to replace boring, redundant, generic verbs with more precise “Awesome Action Words.”
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By DPI Writing Strategies.
Be the sentence: An interactive language arts activity
Students take on the roles of different words and punctuation and work collaboratively to create a complete sentence using correct parts of speech, word order, and punctuation. Students progress from simple sentences to more complex sentences.
Format: lesson plan (grade 3–4 English Language Arts)
By DPI Writing Strategies.
The bear who wouldn't sleep
Intermediate-level ESL students will apply facts from a content-based reading passage to create a short story about a bear who doesn't hibernate with his family.
Format: lesson plan (grade 2 English Language Arts)
By Donna Kauffman.
Birds of a feather, an interdisciplinary unit: Language Arts wing
This lesson, which features Mark Twain's “Jim Baker's Blue-jay Yarn,” is part of an interdisciplinary unit on birds that contains math/science and language arts components. In the language arts wing, students will explore dialects and personification through this very entertaining tall tale full of the antics of talking blue-jays.
Format: lesson plan (grade 7 English Language Arts and English Language Development)
By Janet Fore.
Blackbeard: The most feared pirate of the Atlantic
Students will acquire information about Blackbeard and apply their knowledge to create a newspaper article concerning his life.
Format: lesson plan (grade 4 English Language Arts and Social Studies)
By Carol Holden and Tanya Klanert.